Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146940
Title:
Transmission Dynamics of Trypanosoma Cruzi
Author:
Hacker, Kathryn Patricia
Issue Date:
Aug-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis will examine three aspects of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission dynamics. The first project examines the prevalence of T. cruzi and the non-pathogenic trypanosome T. rangeli in pack rats in peri-urban areas of Tucson, Arizona. As a continuation of this study, we conducted a similar survey in Mariano Melgar, a district in the endemic region of Arequipa, Peru. These projects focus on the importance of the rodent reservoir both in endemic and nonendemic areas for human Chagas disease , and hypothesize that wild rodent populations may be contributing to continued disease transmission. The final study examines the potential for oral transmission of T. cruzi and focuses on the guinea pig as a reservoir host. Combined, these studies provide a holistic understanding of the rodent reservoir host. Understanding the transmission dynamics in both wild rodent and guinea pig populations can help us to better determine the role they play in human Chagas Disease transmission. Such research will provide insight for future intervention studies. The infectivity study in guinea pigs will also provide valuable information for potential modes of transmission in reservoir species. These studies will also provide a comparative analysis of different transmission cycles. By examining these cycles we can better understand the ecology of T. cruzi and its reservoir hosts.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTransmission Dynamics of Trypanosoma Cruzien_US
dc.creatorHacker, Kathryn Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHacker, Kathryn Patriciaen_US
dc.date.issued2010-08-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis will examine three aspects of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission dynamics. The first project examines the prevalence of T. cruzi and the non-pathogenic trypanosome T. rangeli in pack rats in peri-urban areas of Tucson, Arizona. As a continuation of this study, we conducted a similar survey in Mariano Melgar, a district in the endemic region of Arequipa, Peru. These projects focus on the importance of the rodent reservoir both in endemic and nonendemic areas for human Chagas disease , and hypothesize that wild rodent populations may be contributing to continued disease transmission. The final study examines the potential for oral transmission of T. cruzi and focuses on the guinea pig as a reservoir host. Combined, these studies provide a holistic understanding of the rodent reservoir host. Understanding the transmission dynamics in both wild rodent and guinea pig populations can help us to better determine the role they play in human Chagas Disease transmission. Such research will provide insight for future intervention studies. The infectivity study in guinea pigs will also provide valuable information for potential modes of transmission in reservoir species. These studies will also provide a comparative analysis of different transmission cycles. By examining these cycles we can better understand the ecology of T. cruzi and its reservoir hosts.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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