Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146922
Title:
Non-Native Invasive Plants of Arizona
Author:
Howery, Larry D.; Northam, Ed; Meyer, Walt; Arnold, Jennifer; Carrillo, Emilio; Egen, Kristen; Hershdorfer, Mary
Affiliation:
Natural Resources & the Environment, School of
Publisher:
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
2009
Description:
84 pp.; First Edition Published, 2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146922
Abstract:
The noxious weed problem in the western United States has been described as, a biological forest fire racing beyond control because no one wants to be fire boss. Indeed, when small weed infestations are left unchecked, they can grow exponentially and spread across the land much like a slow-moving biological wildfire. However, land consumed by fire usually recovers and is often more productive than before the fire occurred. On the other hand, land consumed by noxious weeds may be irreversibly changed and never again reach its full biological potential.
Type:
text; Book
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Arizona; Invasive; Non-native plants
Series/Report no.:
University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Publication AZ1482

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHowery, Larry D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNortham, Eden_US
dc.contributor.authorMeyer, Walten_US
dc.contributor.authorArnold, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarrillo, Emilioen_US
dc.contributor.authorEgen, Kristenen_US
dc.contributor.authorHershdorfer, Maryen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-25T19:45:43Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-25T19:45:43Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/146922-
dc.description84 pp.en_US
dc.descriptionFirst Edition Published, 2001en_US
dc.description.abstractThe noxious weed problem in the western United States has been described as, a biological forest fire racing beyond control because no one wants to be fire boss. Indeed, when small weed infestations are left unchecked, they can grow exponentially and spread across the land much like a slow-moving biological wildfire. However, land consumed by fire usually recovers and is often more productive than before the fire occurred. On the other hand, land consumed by noxious weeds may be irreversibly changed and never again reach its full biological potential.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUniversity of Arizona Cooperative Extension Publication AZ1482en_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectInvasiveen_US
dc.subjectNon-native plantsen_US
dc.titleNon-Native Invasive Plants of Arizonaen_US
dc.typetext-
dc.typeBook-
dc.contributor.departmentNatural Resources & the Environment, School ofen_US
dc.identifier.calsAZ1482-2009-
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.