To Fight Calamity or Forfeit Humanity: Coping with the Terror of Total Termination

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146913
Title:
To Fight Calamity or Forfeit Humanity: Coping with the Terror of Total Termination
Author:
Donnelly, Kristin
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Previous research in TMT reveals that mortality salience (MS; or a death reminder) increases pro-social giving tendencies and consumerism, both serving to shield death-related concerns. However, little is known about resoponse to the extinction of humanity, which may to some degree operate as a mortality reminder. Using global warming as an extinction prompt, we will investigate the effects of communal extinction on preferences for environmentally-friendly products that may combat the extinction threat. Preferences for eniromentally friendly aspects of consumer products as influenced by the experimental manipulation is predicted to be moderated by individual differences in locus of control. Internal locus of control was predicted to generate greater value for environmentally-friendly characteristics that have been socially valued to minimize global warming. Because external locus of control involves a perception of diminished personal influence on the external world, global mortality salience was predicted to trigger a decreased concern for ―green‖ product characteristics among individuals subscribing to this viewpoint. However, we found Mortality Salience to be the biggest catalyst for favoring green-oriented consumer items above and beyond the extinction prompt of Global Warming.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTo Fight Calamity or Forfeit Humanity: Coping with the Terror of Total Terminationen_US
dc.creatorDonnelly, Kristinen_US
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, Kristinen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPrevious research in TMT reveals that mortality salience (MS; or a death reminder) increases pro-social giving tendencies and consumerism, both serving to shield death-related concerns. However, little is known about resoponse to the extinction of humanity, which may to some degree operate as a mortality reminder. Using global warming as an extinction prompt, we will investigate the effects of communal extinction on preferences for environmentally-friendly products that may combat the extinction threat. Preferences for eniromentally friendly aspects of consumer products as influenced by the experimental manipulation is predicted to be moderated by individual differences in locus of control. Internal locus of control was predicted to generate greater value for environmentally-friendly characteristics that have been socially valued to minimize global warming. Because external locus of control involves a perception of diminished personal influence on the external world, global mortality salience was predicted to trigger a decreased concern for ―green‖ product characteristics among individuals subscribing to this viewpoint. However, we found Mortality Salience to be the biggest catalyst for favoring green-oriented consumer items above and beyond the extinction prompt of Global Warming.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.