Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146899
Title:
The In Vitro Generation of Avian Urate-Containing Spherules
Author:
Burnham, Emily Elizabeth
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Uricotelic animals such as birds excrete approximately 70% of their waste nitrogen in the form of uric acid. This could be a concern due to the low aqueous solubility of uric acid and its salts, yet crystals and stones rarely form in the avian kidney. Our objective was to generate in vitro the urate-containing spherules found in avian urine. A dialysis membrane with a molecular weight cut off of 100 Da was used in chambers to separate two solutions. On one side of the membrane was a solution mimicking avian glomerular filtrate and on the other was solution mimicking avian plasma. The artificial plasma had an osmotic potential higher than that of the filtrate to draw fluid from the filtrate side and thus concentrate the uric acid on the filtrate side. Three permutations and a control were conducted to examine the effect of calcium and cholesterol on sphere formation. The increase in uric acid concentration lead to the formation of spheres about 1 micron in diameter in the permutations that included calcium. It is not certain whether cholesterol contributes to the spheres. However, it appears that divalent cations such as calcium are necessary for the formation of the urate and protein-containing spheres.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe In Vitro Generation of Avian Urate-Containing Spherulesen_US
dc.creatorBurnham, Emily Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurnham, Emily Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractUricotelic animals such as birds excrete approximately 70% of their waste nitrogen in the form of uric acid. This could be a concern due to the low aqueous solubility of uric acid and its salts, yet crystals and stones rarely form in the avian kidney. Our objective was to generate in vitro the urate-containing spherules found in avian urine. A dialysis membrane with a molecular weight cut off of 100 Da was used in chambers to separate two solutions. On one side of the membrane was a solution mimicking avian glomerular filtrate and on the other was solution mimicking avian plasma. The artificial plasma had an osmotic potential higher than that of the filtrate to draw fluid from the filtrate side and thus concentrate the uric acid on the filtrate side. Three permutations and a control were conducted to examine the effect of calcium and cholesterol on sphere formation. The increase in uric acid concentration lead to the formation of spheres about 1 micron in diameter in the permutations that included calcium. It is not certain whether cholesterol contributes to the spheres. However, it appears that divalent cations such as calcium are necessary for the formation of the urate and protein-containing spheres.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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