Decision Making and Wellbeing Among Women with Breast Cancer and Children at Home

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146883
Title:
Decision Making and Wellbeing Among Women with Breast Cancer and Children at Home
Author:
Davidson, Angela S.
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of the study was to (a) describe decision-making, coping strategies, and wellbeing of women undergoing breast cancer treatment who have children at home; and (b) compare and contrast the treatment decisions, coping strategies and wellbeing of women with breast cancer who have children under 18 years old with those who do not have children under 18 years old at home. Secondary data analysis of transcribed interviews was performed using content and matrix analysis to determine decision making processes and coping strategies and a de-identified database, containing demographic data and scores from the FACT-B, was analyzed as indicators of perceived wellbeing. Findings indicate that children seem to have an influence on treatment decisions, coping and wellbeing. Women with children at home more often chose bilateral mastectomies and used more mind-body based complementary and alternative medicine. Also, in the social and family subscale score women with children have higher wellbeing. Finally, all women used all types of coping strategies with highest use of emotionbased coping and women citing children as an influencing factor. Further research is necessary to determine the extent of their impact. Ultimately, when caring or studying women with breast cancer, children must be considered a potential factor that modifies cancer treatment decisions.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDecision Making and Wellbeing Among Women with Breast Cancer and Children at Homeen_US
dc.creatorDavidson, Angela S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Angela S.en_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the study was to (a) describe decision-making, coping strategies, and wellbeing of women undergoing breast cancer treatment who have children at home; and (b) compare and contrast the treatment decisions, coping strategies and wellbeing of women with breast cancer who have children under 18 years old with those who do not have children under 18 years old at home. Secondary data analysis of transcribed interviews was performed using content and matrix analysis to determine decision making processes and coping strategies and a de-identified database, containing demographic data and scores from the FACT-B, was analyzed as indicators of perceived wellbeing. Findings indicate that children seem to have an influence on treatment decisions, coping and wellbeing. Women with children at home more often chose bilateral mastectomies and used more mind-body based complementary and alternative medicine. Also, in the social and family subscale score women with children have higher wellbeing. Finally, all women used all types of coping strategies with highest use of emotionbased coping and women citing children as an influencing factor. Further research is necessary to determine the extent of their impact. Ultimately, when caring or studying women with breast cancer, children must be considered a potential factor that modifies cancer treatment decisions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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