Optical Imaging Using VEGF Receptor-Targeted Probe in AOM-Treated Mice

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146832
Title:
Optical Imaging Using VEGF Receptor-Targeted Probe in AOM-Treated Mice
Author:
Zong, Yue
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Tumor growth is connected with increased vascular growth, where vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and its associated receptor (VEGFR) may be overexpressed, initiating the growth of endothelial cells and increasing tumor vasculature. In a previous study conducted in our lab, a VEGFR-targeted fluorescent dye probe (scVEGF-Cy5.5) was imaged in vivo to aggregate in tumor areas. However, an untargeted probe (inVEGF-Cy5.5) also accumulated in tumors. The purpose of this study is to determine if the mechanism for accumulation differs between targeted and untargeted probes. A combined system of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) was used to visualize fluorescent dyes in vivo in tumor and normal colon in four animals. Post imaging, the colon was excised, opened longitudinally, frozen, and multiple sections taken at 8 longitudinal positions. Sequential sections were stained with H&E for diagnosis, immunostained for VEGFR-2, and left unstained for Cy5.5 dye visualization. Analysis showed that scVEGF-Cy5.5 is co-located with regions of VEGFR-2 immunostaining, a match not seen with inVEGF-Cy5.5 probe. InVEGF-Cy5.5 accumulated in adenomas and lymphoid aggregates, normal structures often near tumors in diseased regions. Both probes showed non-specific accumulation on the surface of the colon, perhaps due to the method of application of the dye. Results suggest that both probes will co-localize with tumors, but through different mechanisms.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleOptical Imaging Using VEGF Receptor-Targeted Probe in AOM-Treated Miceen_US
dc.creatorZong, Yueen_US
dc.contributor.authorZong, Yueen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTumor growth is connected with increased vascular growth, where vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and its associated receptor (VEGFR) may be overexpressed, initiating the growth of endothelial cells and increasing tumor vasculature. In a previous study conducted in our lab, a VEGFR-targeted fluorescent dye probe (scVEGF-Cy5.5) was imaged in vivo to aggregate in tumor areas. However, an untargeted probe (inVEGF-Cy5.5) also accumulated in tumors. The purpose of this study is to determine if the mechanism for accumulation differs between targeted and untargeted probes. A combined system of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) was used to visualize fluorescent dyes in vivo in tumor and normal colon in four animals. Post imaging, the colon was excised, opened longitudinally, frozen, and multiple sections taken at 8 longitudinal positions. Sequential sections were stained with H&E for diagnosis, immunostained for VEGFR-2, and left unstained for Cy5.5 dye visualization. Analysis showed that scVEGF-Cy5.5 is co-located with regions of VEGFR-2 immunostaining, a match not seen with inVEGF-Cy5.5 probe. InVEGF-Cy5.5 accumulated in adenomas and lymphoid aggregates, normal structures often near tumors in diseased regions. Both probes showed non-specific accumulation on the surface of the colon, perhaps due to the method of application of the dye. Results suggest that both probes will co-localize with tumors, but through different mechanisms.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiochemistry and Molecular Biophysicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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