Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146734
Title:
Batty About Bats
Author:
Gouge, Dawn; Lawaczeck, E.; Snyder, J.; Renison, Nancy
Affiliation:
Entomology
Publisher:
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
Nov-2008
Description:
16 pp.; Bat IPM
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146734
Abstract:
Bats, order Chiroptera, have traditionally been maligned and misunderstood by the general public. Bats are, however, important components of the natural and urban landscape; they provide valuable pest control of public health and nuisance insects, and they serve an important role in the pollination of several of Arizona's native columnar cacti. In urban environments, particularly schools, bats are of concern due to their ability to vector the rabies virus. Consequently, the status of bats of bats in schools has become that of a pest. Integrated pest management (IPM) methods have traditionally been reserved for managing arthropods; however, the fundamental principles of urban IPM may be just as easily applied to mammals with equal success. The ecologically sensitive aspects of IPM make this a highly preferred approach in managing bats as an organism of considerable conservation concern.
Type:
text; Pamphlet
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Bats; IPM; Schools
Series/Report no.:
University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Publication AZ1456

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGouge, Dawnen_US
dc.contributor.authorLawaczeck, E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSnyder, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRenison, Nancyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-24T20:53:08Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-24T20:53:08Z-
dc.date.issued2008-11-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/146734-
dc.description16 pp.en_US
dc.descriptionBat IPMen_US
dc.description.abstractBats, order Chiroptera, have traditionally been maligned and misunderstood by the general public. Bats are, however, important components of the natural and urban landscape; they provide valuable pest control of public health and nuisance insects, and they serve an important role in the pollination of several of Arizona's native columnar cacti. In urban environments, particularly schools, bats are of concern due to their ability to vector the rabies virus. Consequently, the status of bats of bats in schools has become that of a pest. Integrated pest management (IPM) methods have traditionally been reserved for managing arthropods; however, the fundamental principles of urban IPM may be just as easily applied to mammals with equal success. The ecologically sensitive aspects of IPM make this a highly preferred approach in managing bats as an organism of considerable conservation concern.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUniversity of Arizona Cooperative Extension Publication AZ1456en_US
dc.subjectBatsen_US
dc.subjectIPMen_US
dc.subjectSchoolsen_US
dc.titleBatty About Batsen_US
dc.typetext-
dc.typePamphlet-
dc.contributor.departmentEntomologyen_US
dc.identifier.calsAZ1456-2008-
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