Attachment, Language, and Divorce: The Role of Linguistic Immediacy in Coping

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146698
Title:
Attachment, Language, and Divorce: The Role of Linguistic Immediacy in Coping
Author:
Vasquez, Monique J.
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
One hundred twenty-nine adults (46 men) participated in a study following marital separation. Along with self-report measures, participants completed a stream of consciousness task asking them to speak into a recording device about their divorce experience. Their speech was analyzed for linguistic patterns demonstrating verbal immediacy and psychological distancing. We hypothesized that those with high levels of anxious attachment, in conjunction with high levels of verbal immediacy would have worse divorce adjustment than those with lower levels of both constructs. We also predicted that those with high levels of avoidance and high levels of psychological distancing would also have poorer adjustment than those with lower levels. We found that verbal immediacy correlated with divorce adjustment, and that divorce adjustment correlated with anxiety although there was no interaction among the three variables. Our exploratory analyses showed that while avoidance was not directly linked with poor adjustment, avoidant individuals report increased feelings of intrusiveness over time. The study of individual differences in adjustment can help improve our understanding of coping mechanisms, language and attachment.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAttachment, Language, and Divorce: The Role of Linguistic Immediacy in Copingen_US
dc.creatorVasquez, Monique J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVasquez, Monique J.en_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOne hundred twenty-nine adults (46 men) participated in a study following marital separation. Along with self-report measures, participants completed a stream of consciousness task asking them to speak into a recording device about their divorce experience. Their speech was analyzed for linguistic patterns demonstrating verbal immediacy and psychological distancing. We hypothesized that those with high levels of anxious attachment, in conjunction with high levels of verbal immediacy would have worse divorce adjustment than those with lower levels of both constructs. We also predicted that those with high levels of avoidance and high levels of psychological distancing would also have poorer adjustment than those with lower levels. We found that verbal immediacy correlated with divorce adjustment, and that divorce adjustment correlated with anxiety although there was no interaction among the three variables. Our exploratory analyses showed that while avoidance was not directly linked with poor adjustment, avoidant individuals report increased feelings of intrusiveness over time. The study of individual differences in adjustment can help improve our understanding of coping mechanisms, language and attachment.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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