"Neighborhood in Constant Alarm": The Battle of Ramsour's Mill and Partisan Divisions in the Carolina Backcountry Communities During the American Revolution

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146677
Title:
"Neighborhood in Constant Alarm": The Battle of Ramsour's Mill and Partisan Divisions in the Carolina Backcountry Communities During the American Revolution
Author:
Smith, Austin William
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis tracks the development of partisan divisions in the Carolina backcountry during the American Revolutionary War by examining the events and processes that influenced their creation. Chapter one studies how mills created local relationships and interactions within the Carolina interior through their means for food production, drawing the local populace in for social and economic engagement. Chapter two discusses the progress of loyalist and patriot entrenchments from the beginning of the war in 1775 when neutrality predominated until the threat of British invasion in 1780. The passage of local resolves, the Cherokee conflict of 1776, the intervening years of relative peace, the capture of Charleston, and rumors of violent massacre and crime are discussed. In chapter three, a thorough examination of the understudied Battle of Ramsour's Mill of June 1780 features as a case study into the divisions that occurred during the bloodiest portion of the war in the southern theatre as well as the new roles mills acquired as military staging areas and strategic production sites for food provisions. The consequences of the outcome of this understudied conflict within the American Revolution at large are reevaluated in conclusion.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.title"Neighborhood in Constant Alarm": The Battle of Ramsour's Mill and Partisan Divisions in the Carolina Backcountry Communities During the American Revolutionen_US
dc.creatorSmith, Austin Williamen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Austin Williamen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis tracks the development of partisan divisions in the Carolina backcountry during the American Revolutionary War by examining the events and processes that influenced their creation. Chapter one studies how mills created local relationships and interactions within the Carolina interior through their means for food production, drawing the local populace in for social and economic engagement. Chapter two discusses the progress of loyalist and patriot entrenchments from the beginning of the war in 1775 when neutrality predominated until the threat of British invasion in 1780. The passage of local resolves, the Cherokee conflict of 1776, the intervening years of relative peace, the capture of Charleston, and rumors of violent massacre and crime are discussed. In chapter three, a thorough examination of the understudied Battle of Ramsour's Mill of June 1780 features as a case study into the divisions that occurred during the bloodiest portion of the war in the southern theatre as well as the new roles mills acquired as military staging areas and strategic production sites for food provisions. The consequences of the outcome of this understudied conflict within the American Revolution at large are reevaluated in conclusion.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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