The Effect of Prenatal Nicotine Exposure on Ventilation Parameters and Receptor Expression in the Neonatal Rat Brainstem

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146649
Title:
The Effect of Prenatal Nicotine Exposure on Ventilation Parameters and Receptor Expression in the Neonatal Rat Brainstem
Author:
Saccomano, Margaret Eloise
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Prenatal nicotine exposure has recently been linked to respiratory dysfunction in infants and has been named one of the largest contributing factors in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Experiments were performed using the neonatal rat model to determine the mechanism behind the link between prenatal nicotine exposure and respiratory dysfunction, clinically manifesting itself as SIDS. Protocol called for full body plethysmography to be performed on nicotine exposed or saline exposed neonates on postnatal days 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 21. However, a dysfunctioning apparatus impeded ventilation procedures. Animals were then transcardially perfused, postfixed and brains were dissected. Medullas were cut into 40 μm transverse slices and mounted on electrostatic slides. Immunohistochemistry was used to fluorescently tag cells containing important structure and receptors within the medulla including NeuN, NK-1R, nAChR, GABA-AR and Glutamate AMPAR. Cells were visualized for receptor expression and receptor density in control animals vs. PNE animals was studied. Needed changes in protocol prevented conclusive findings that established the relationship in question. These changes included the use of Trizma buffer over PBS and the reduction in the concentration of the fluorescent secondary antibodies used. However these changes will prove to be useful information in further experiments.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Effect of Prenatal Nicotine Exposure on Ventilation Parameters and Receptor Expression in the Neonatal Rat Brainstemen_US
dc.creatorSaccomano, Margaret Eloiseen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaccomano, Margaret Eloiseen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPrenatal nicotine exposure has recently been linked to respiratory dysfunction in infants and has been named one of the largest contributing factors in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Experiments were performed using the neonatal rat model to determine the mechanism behind the link between prenatal nicotine exposure and respiratory dysfunction, clinically manifesting itself as SIDS. Protocol called for full body plethysmography to be performed on nicotine exposed or saline exposed neonates on postnatal days 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 21. However, a dysfunctioning apparatus impeded ventilation procedures. Animals were then transcardially perfused, postfixed and brains were dissected. Medullas were cut into 40 μm transverse slices and mounted on electrostatic slides. Immunohistochemistry was used to fluorescently tag cells containing important structure and receptors within the medulla including NeuN, NK-1R, nAChR, GABA-AR and Glutamate AMPAR. Cells were visualized for receptor expression and receptor density in control animals vs. PNE animals was studied. Needed changes in protocol prevented conclusive findings that established the relationship in question. These changes included the use of Trizma buffer over PBS and the reduction in the concentration of the fluorescent secondary antibodies used. However these changes will prove to be useful information in further experiments.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.