Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146648
Title:
Development of a Remote Pulse Oximeter
Author:
Sankman, Joseph; Bailey, Brian; Ebel, Brian; Galvin, Scott; Grantham, Jack; Little, Scott; Morey, Erica; Stemple, Christopher
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Pulse oximetry is widely maintained as the standard method for measuring a person?s blood oxygen saturation. Monitoring such a vital sign allows for detecting the onset and progression of various diseases and conditions that could result in tissue and organ damage or death due to lack of required oxygen delivery. The goal of this project was to design a pulse oximeter geared toward consumer use that could wirelessly transmit data to a portable device, such as a smartphone, for convenient, remote monitoring of oxygen saturation. This report describes the design process for developing a working prototype of the pulse oximeter. Texas Instruments sponsored this project for the Interdisciplinary Engineering Design Program at the University of Arizona. Their goal in funding this project was to develop an intimate knowledge base of the considerations, components, and overall design of a pulse oximeter in order to better assist their customers. The creation of the pulse oximeter reference design was inspired by thorough research on the scientific principles underlying pulse oximetry as well as existing pulse oximeter technologies. From the information collected, the team developed three potential designs for the device. Analysis of each design was conducted to distinguish the one design that would be further developed and fabricated into the working reference design required by the project sponsor. Results obtained by testing the final prototype, discussion of future directions for the reference design, and conclusions drawn from the completion of the project are also presented in this report.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Electrical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of a Remote Pulse Oximeteren_US
dc.creatorSankman, Josephen_US
dc.creatorBailey, Brianen_US
dc.creatorEbel, Brianen_US
dc.creatorGalvin, Scotten_US
dc.creatorGrantham, Jacken_US
dc.creatorLittle, Scotten_US
dc.creatorMorey, Ericaen_US
dc.creatorStemple, Christopheren_US
dc.contributor.authorSankman, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Brianen_US
dc.contributor.authorEbel, Brianen_US
dc.contributor.authorGalvin, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.authorGrantham, Jacken_US
dc.contributor.authorLittle, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.authorMorey, Ericaen_US
dc.contributor.authorStemple, Christopheren_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPulse oximetry is widely maintained as the standard method for measuring a person?s blood oxygen saturation. Monitoring such a vital sign allows for detecting the onset and progression of various diseases and conditions that could result in tissue and organ damage or death due to lack of required oxygen delivery. The goal of this project was to design a pulse oximeter geared toward consumer use that could wirelessly transmit data to a portable device, such as a smartphone, for convenient, remote monitoring of oxygen saturation. This report describes the design process for developing a working prototype of the pulse oximeter. Texas Instruments sponsored this project for the Interdisciplinary Engineering Design Program at the University of Arizona. Their goal in funding this project was to develop an intimate knowledge base of the considerations, components, and overall design of a pulse oximeter in order to better assist their customers. The creation of the pulse oximeter reference design was inspired by thorough research on the scientific principles underlying pulse oximetry as well as existing pulse oximeter technologies. From the information collected, the team developed three potential designs for the device. Analysis of each design was conducted to distinguish the one design that would be further developed and fabricated into the working reference design required by the project sponsor. Results obtained by testing the final prototype, discussion of future directions for the reference design, and conclusions drawn from the completion of the project are also presented in this report.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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