The Effects of Politics on HIV/AIDS Policy in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Comparative Study of South Africa and Uganda

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146627
Title:
The Effects of Politics on HIV/AIDS Policy in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Comparative Study of South Africa and Uganda
Author:
Rubin, Adam Nathan
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This paper evaluates the effects of politics on HIV/AIDS policy in sub-Saharan Africa, specifically comparing South Africa and Uganda. It investigates factors of history and identity in shaping AIDS policy in these countries, while also addressing the role of knowledge and the counter-epistemic community. By understanding the role of leadership in agenda-setting and subsequent state responses to the AIDS epidemic, this argument helps to explain why Uganda has been held up as a model of success in the fight against HIV/AIDS and why South Africa has failed to implement effective policy. This paper concludes with an assessment of how HIV/AIDS is currently being addressed in South Africa and Uganda, and what implications this may hold for the future of the AIDS epidemic.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Effects of Politics on HIV/AIDS Policy in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Comparative Study of South Africa and Ugandaen_US
dc.creatorRubin, Adam Nathanen_US
dc.contributor.authorRubin, Adam Nathanen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper evaluates the effects of politics on HIV/AIDS policy in sub-Saharan Africa, specifically comparing South Africa and Uganda. It investigates factors of history and identity in shaping AIDS policy in these countries, while also addressing the role of knowledge and the counter-epistemic community. By understanding the role of leadership in agenda-setting and subsequent state responses to the AIDS epidemic, this argument helps to explain why Uganda has been held up as a model of success in the fight against HIV/AIDS and why South Africa has failed to implement effective policy. This paper concludes with an assessment of how HIV/AIDS is currently being addressed in South Africa and Uganda, and what implications this may hold for the future of the AIDS epidemic.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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