Allelic Heterozygosity Within and Among Giardia Lamblia Genotype B Isolates

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146616
Title:
Allelic Heterozygosity Within and Among Giardia Lamblia Genotype B Isolates
Author:
Narla, Nirmala Priya
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Giardia lamblia is a binucleate intestinal pathogen belonging to an early diverging eukaryotic lineage. It is responsible for many cases of diarrheal disease worldwide, with two distinct Giardia genotypes, A and B, known to infect human hosts. The level of genetic diversity among genotype B isolates is not sufficiently understood. Thus, we attempt to analyze what is happening at a population genetics level to produce unique allelic sequence heterozygosity patterns. In this report, I analyzed an 869 bp region on the chromosome 3 locus and a 532 bp region on chromosome 5, by comparing multiple cloned PCR products from the reference genotype B isolate GS and 6 genotype B field isolates. We found a total of 44 and 19 SNP sites at the chromosome 3 and 5 loci, respectively. Each of the seven isolates had much higher numbers of haplotypes at the two chromosomal loci than could be explained by allelic sequence heterozygosity (ASH), and haplotype ratios did not suggest ASH as the reason for the diversity. We narrow down the reasons for allelic divergence, and implicate the potential accumulation of sequence variability in individual lineages. A comprehensive understanding of the genetic diversity within and among genotype B organisms will be important in evaluating parasite variation, the mechanisms for genetic exchange among early eukaryotes, and the taxonomic classification of Giardia genotypes.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Molecular and Cellular Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAllelic Heterozygosity Within and Among Giardia Lamblia Genotype B Isolatesen_US
dc.creatorNarla, Nirmala Priyaen_US
dc.contributor.authorNarla, Nirmala Priyaen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractGiardia lamblia is a binucleate intestinal pathogen belonging to an early diverging eukaryotic lineage. It is responsible for many cases of diarrheal disease worldwide, with two distinct Giardia genotypes, A and B, known to infect human hosts. The level of genetic diversity among genotype B isolates is not sufficiently understood. Thus, we attempt to analyze what is happening at a population genetics level to produce unique allelic sequence heterozygosity patterns. In this report, I analyzed an 869 bp region on the chromosome 3 locus and a 532 bp region on chromosome 5, by comparing multiple cloned PCR products from the reference genotype B isolate GS and 6 genotype B field isolates. We found a total of 44 and 19 SNP sites at the chromosome 3 and 5 loci, respectively. Each of the seven isolates had much higher numbers of haplotypes at the two chromosomal loci than could be explained by allelic sequence heterozygosity (ASH), and haplotype ratios did not suggest ASH as the reason for the diversity. We narrow down the reasons for allelic divergence, and implicate the potential accumulation of sequence variability in individual lineages. A comprehensive understanding of the genetic diversity within and among genotype B organisms will be important in evaluating parasite variation, the mechanisms for genetic exchange among early eukaryotes, and the taxonomic classification of Giardia genotypes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular and Cellular Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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