Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146596
Title:
Spectrum Familium: A Collection
Author:
Kneale, Emily Alexandria
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This collection started with an idea: stories based around color. One story, two story, Red Story, Blue Story. In my mind, colors have great symbolic weight, flavor, cultural importance, and potential--so I thought it a great way to imbue my stories with more depth, more symbolism, and spice. I discovered a study published in 1969 called "Basic Color Terms: Their Universality and Evolution" that placed the development of color terms alongside the development of language in cultures around the world. Dark-light, cool-hot colors come first--like black and white. Then red. Then green or yellow. Then blue. So that's the order I used. Of course, this order didn't work for every language, and neither did the order of my stories, because color is a fluctuating concept. Its abstract--and red means something different to each of us. Passion, fire, love, anger. So, armed with a list of simple "symbolic interpretations" of my colors, I set about to create some stories, but I really created a family. A mother dealing with bi-polar disorder. Twins hoping to cope. A husband unsure of how to deal with her, his emotions, or pancakes. Spectrum Familium: A Collection stretches beyond the colors and the theory that were, for me, a jumping off point, and into a colorful study of family dynamics, mental illness, and perspective.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Creative Writing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSpectrum Familium: A Collectionen_US
dc.creatorKneale, Emily Alexandriaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKneale, Emily Alexandriaen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis collection started with an idea: stories based around color. One story, two story, Red Story, Blue Story. In my mind, colors have great symbolic weight, flavor, cultural importance, and potential--so I thought it a great way to imbue my stories with more depth, more symbolism, and spice. I discovered a study published in 1969 called "Basic Color Terms: Their Universality and Evolution" that placed the development of color terms alongside the development of language in cultures around the world. Dark-light, cool-hot colors come first--like black and white. Then red. Then green or yellow. Then blue. So that's the order I used. Of course, this order didn't work for every language, and neither did the order of my stories, because color is a fluctuating concept. Its abstract--and red means something different to each of us. Passion, fire, love, anger. So, armed with a list of simple "symbolic interpretations" of my colors, I set about to create some stories, but I really created a family. A mother dealing with bi-polar disorder. Twins hoping to cope. A husband unsure of how to deal with her, his emotions, or pancakes. Spectrum Familium: A Collection stretches beyond the colors and the theory that were, for me, a jumping off point, and into a colorful study of family dynamics, mental illness, and perspective.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCreative Writingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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