Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146592
Title:
On the Future of the H-1B Immigrant Visa Program
Author:
Clapp, Alexander Kenneth
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Dating back to its inception in 1990, the United States? H-1B visa program has been marked by intense debate. Through this program, companies are allowed to bring in non-immigrant workers with special skills for temporary employment in specialized occupations. The program?s intent has been to drive higher-level industries within the US by attracting the brightest, most talented workers globally. The first objective of this investigation is to determine the central issues regarding H-1B policy which affect the economic development and homeland security of the US. Since these are non-immigrant workers being allowed to enter the US, H-1B visas directly affect industry wages and domestic employment, and they can also potentially pose a threat to homeland security. This investigation will offer a brief history of the H-1B visa program before isolating the key issues which will guide future reform. The second objective of this investigation is to formulate potential areas for improvement. The determination of reform proposals will be guided by both literature review as well as expert interviews. Through a series of proposals, this thesis seeks to present ideas which strengthen the original intent of the H-1B program by fostering economic development and protecting homeland security through regulation and enforcement.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Business Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleOn the Future of the H-1B Immigrant Visa Programen_US
dc.creatorClapp, Alexander Kennethen_US
dc.contributor.authorClapp, Alexander Kennethen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDating back to its inception in 1990, the United States? H-1B visa program has been marked by intense debate. Through this program, companies are allowed to bring in non-immigrant workers with special skills for temporary employment in specialized occupations. The program?s intent has been to drive higher-level industries within the US by attracting the brightest, most talented workers globally. The first objective of this investigation is to determine the central issues regarding H-1B policy which affect the economic development and homeland security of the US. Since these are non-immigrant workers being allowed to enter the US, H-1B visas directly affect industry wages and domestic employment, and they can also potentially pose a threat to homeland security. This investigation will offer a brief history of the H-1B visa program before isolating the key issues which will guide future reform. The second objective of this investigation is to formulate potential areas for improvement. The determination of reform proposals will be guided by both literature review as well as expert interviews. Through a series of proposals, this thesis seeks to present ideas which strengthen the original intent of the H-1B program by fostering economic development and protecting homeland security through regulation and enforcement.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Managementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.