Reconsolidation and the Role of Retrieval Context in Human Episodic Memory Recall

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146590
Title:
Reconsolidation and the Role of Retrieval Context in Human Episodic Memory Recall
Author:
Catallini, Mary Carroll
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The reconsolidation effect shows that memory can be reactivated and returned to a labile state, where it can be modified and reconsolidated to include new information. This study investigates the role of recall context in memory reconsolidation. Participants were taught a set of 20 objects in one location (context A) and a second set 48 hours later in a new location (context B) after either receiving a reminder of Day 1 or receiving no reminder. Fortyeight hours later they were asked to recall one set of objects while in context B. As anticipated, a one-way effect was demonstrated in which some participants misattribute Day 2 items to Day 1. However, for participants recalling Set 1, some individuals intruded Set 2 objects regardless of receiving a reminder while others did not. Individual differences in the types of retrieval cues used for recall may explain this ambiguous result.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleReconsolidation and the Role of Retrieval Context in Human Episodic Memory Recallen_US
dc.creatorCatallini, Mary Carrollen_US
dc.contributor.authorCatallini, Mary Carrollen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe reconsolidation effect shows that memory can be reactivated and returned to a labile state, where it can be modified and reconsolidated to include new information. This study investigates the role of recall context in memory reconsolidation. Participants were taught a set of 20 objects in one location (context A) and a second set 48 hours later in a new location (context B) after either receiving a reminder of Day 1 or receiving no reminder. Fortyeight hours later they were asked to recall one set of objects while in context B. As anticipated, a one-way effect was demonstrated in which some participants misattribute Day 2 items to Day 1. However, for participants recalling Set 1, some individuals intruded Set 2 objects regardless of receiving a reminder while others did not. Individual differences in the types of retrieval cues used for recall may explain this ambiguous result.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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