China's One Child Policy and Male Surplus as a Source of Demand for Sex Trafficking to China

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146588
Title:
China's One Child Policy and Male Surplus as a Source of Demand for Sex Trafficking to China
Author:
Hall, Andrew Thomas
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Chinese government cites the country's controversial One Child Policy as a key factor in China's economic rise over the last few decades. Lower birth rates, they argue, correlate to more rapid development. However, in a society with a deeply-rooted preference for sons, the policy has caused an unforeseen uptake in female infanticide and feticide, translating to a drastic imbalance in sex ratios in Chinese demography, particularly among under-20 Chinese. With some 40 million men unable to find wives by 2020, China faces an unprecedented demographic problem. One of the most devastating effects of the One Child Policy and sex ratio imbalance is a sharp uptake in demand for sex trafficking to China, particularly forced prostitution and trafficking for marriage. More sex trafficking in China may spell disaster not only for hundreds of thousands of women and girls trafficked for sex, but also for Chinese society at large--sex trafficking accelerates the spread of HIV and compromises national security as borders become more porous and organized crime becomes more ubiquitous. The Chinese government, the US government, inter-governmental organizations like the UN and ASEAN, and non-governmental organizations each have specific roles to play in curbing the flow of sex trafficking in China.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; International/Interdisciplinary Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleChina's One Child Policy and Male Surplus as a Source of Demand for Sex Trafficking to Chinaen_US
dc.creatorHall, Andrew Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorHall, Andrew Thomasen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Chinese government cites the country's controversial One Child Policy as a key factor in China's economic rise over the last few decades. Lower birth rates, they argue, correlate to more rapid development. However, in a society with a deeply-rooted preference for sons, the policy has caused an unforeseen uptake in female infanticide and feticide, translating to a drastic imbalance in sex ratios in Chinese demography, particularly among under-20 Chinese. With some 40 million men unable to find wives by 2020, China faces an unprecedented demographic problem. One of the most devastating effects of the One Child Policy and sex ratio imbalance is a sharp uptake in demand for sex trafficking to China, particularly forced prostitution and trafficking for marriage. More sex trafficking in China may spell disaster not only for hundreds of thousands of women and girls trafficked for sex, but also for Chinese society at large--sex trafficking accelerates the spread of HIV and compromises national security as borders become more porous and organized crime becomes more ubiquitous. The Chinese government, the US government, inter-governmental organizations like the UN and ASEAN, and non-governmental organizations each have specific roles to play in curbing the flow of sex trafficking in China.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInternational/Interdisciplinary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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