Measurement of Telomere Length in Rat Endothelial Cells: Modification of a Technique Used in Human Mononuclear Cells

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146251
Title:
Measurement of Telomere Length in Rat Endothelial Cells: Modification of a Technique Used in Human Mononuclear Cells
Author:
Galles, Lindsay Lee Ann
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Background and significance: The rapidly aging population increases the incidence of age-related disease. Biological age can be accelerated by factors, such as smoking and poor diet. Telomeres, which cap ends of chromosomes, are markers of biological aging. Critically short telomeres induce cellular replicative senescence. Senescent cells are not capable of regeneration and are associated with many human age-related diseases; therefore, it is beneficial to develop a related assay for use in aging rat models. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop an assay to measure telomere length in rat cells as a marker of biological age. Methods and results: This study was performed using endothelial cells from the lungs of young (3 month) and old (24 month) Fischer 344 rats at PD4 and PD3, respectively. Telomere length in young rat cells was longer compared to old rats (p < 0.05; Students t --test). Cells from were then cultured sequentially to age cells and the modified protocol was again employed. Analysis by two-way ANOVA of telomere length showed significant differences (p < 0.01) between rat age, extent of sequential sub-culturing, and interaction effects. These results support successful modification a human telomere length assay for use in aging rat studies.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMeasurement of Telomere Length in Rat Endothelial Cells: Modification of a Technique Used in Human Mononuclear Cellsen_US
dc.creatorGalles, Lindsay Lee Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorGalles, Lindsay Lee Annen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground and significance: The rapidly aging population increases the incidence of age-related disease. Biological age can be accelerated by factors, such as smoking and poor diet. Telomeres, which cap ends of chromosomes, are markers of biological aging. Critically short telomeres induce cellular replicative senescence. Senescent cells are not capable of regeneration and are associated with many human age-related diseases; therefore, it is beneficial to develop a related assay for use in aging rat models. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop an assay to measure telomere length in rat cells as a marker of biological age. Methods and results: This study was performed using endothelial cells from the lungs of young (3 month) and old (24 month) Fischer 344 rats at PD4 and PD3, respectively. Telomere length in young rat cells was longer compared to old rats (p < 0.05; Students t --test). Cells from were then cultured sequentially to age cells and the modified protocol was again employed. Analysis by two-way ANOVA of telomere length showed significant differences (p < 0.01) between rat age, extent of sequential sub-culturing, and interaction effects. These results support successful modification a human telomere length assay for use in aging rat studies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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