Background and Research on Copper Alloys as an Antimicrobial Surface and the CusB protein of the Copper-Transporting Efflux System CusCFBA

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146238
Title:
Background and Research on Copper Alloys as an Antimicrobial Surface and the CusB protein of the Copper-Transporting Efflux System CusCFBA
Author:
Andrade, Cassandra Jo
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Bactericidal properties of copper surfaces have been investigated in search of selfsanitizing materials in food and healthcare industries. However, bacteria in these environments are rapidly acquiring antibiotic and heavy metal resistance, which is thought to be a co-selection process (Baker-Austin, 2006). Copper-resistant strains of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecium isolated from pigs fed copper sulfate were examined (Hasman, 2002). Survival of strains was tested by timed incubation on onesquare- inch copper alloys with varying degrees of moisture during inoculation of the surfaces. Results showed rapid killing of E. coli and E. faecium copper-resistant strains when samples were spread in a thin layer on alloys with 85 % or greater copper content. E. coli strains had short survival rates under dry conditions while E. faecium strains were less affected. Dry or wet inoculations had no effect on the survival rates on stainless steel, since strains survived equally and no die-off was seen. Re-inoculation with E. coli on the alloys every 3 hours over a 24-hour period showed no CFUs remaining at each time point tested while bacteria survived without reduction of CFUs on the stainless steel controls after 24 hours. Results indicate that the bactericidal properties of metallic copper surfaces can be effective in killing copper-resistant strains of E. coli and E. faecium.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Microbiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleBackground and Research on Copper Alloys as an Antimicrobial Surface and the CusB protein of the Copper-Transporting Efflux System CusCFBAen_US
dc.creatorAndrade, Cassandra Joen_US
dc.contributor.authorAndrade, Cassandra Joen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBactericidal properties of copper surfaces have been investigated in search of selfsanitizing materials in food and healthcare industries. However, bacteria in these environments are rapidly acquiring antibiotic and heavy metal resistance, which is thought to be a co-selection process (Baker-Austin, 2006). Copper-resistant strains of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecium isolated from pigs fed copper sulfate were examined (Hasman, 2002). Survival of strains was tested by timed incubation on onesquare- inch copper alloys with varying degrees of moisture during inoculation of the surfaces. Results showed rapid killing of E. coli and E. faecium copper-resistant strains when samples were spread in a thin layer on alloys with 85 % or greater copper content. E. coli strains had short survival rates under dry conditions while E. faecium strains were less affected. Dry or wet inoculations had no effect on the survival rates on stainless steel, since strains survived equally and no die-off was seen. Re-inoculation with E. coli on the alloys every 3 hours over a 24-hour period showed no CFUs remaining at each time point tested while bacteria survived without reduction of CFUs on the stainless steel controls after 24 hours. Results indicate that the bactericidal properties of metallic copper surfaces can be effective in killing copper-resistant strains of E. coli and E. faecium.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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