Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146232
Title:
Gasification of Algae for the Production of CNG
Author:
Ronan, Zachary Wayne
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The goal of this project is to create compressed natural gas (CNG) from methane. This process is intended to serve as an environmentally friendly supplement to other sources of natural gas, such as the natural gas found alongside fossil fuels. Algae are to be converted into natural gas in supercritical water at an algae mass percent of 2.5%. The reactor uses a ruthenium catalyst on a carbon structure. The process is environmentally friendly because the carbon dioxide produced in the reactor and the furnace is recycled back to algae farms, thereby significantly reducing the net carbon dioxide emissions. Also, the salts that are removed from the algae are recycled to the algae farms thereby eliminating any potentially toxic byproducts. A process hazard analysis was completed to reduce any potential safety concerns involved with the process. An economic analysis was performed and the process was determined to not be economically viable at the current time. However, improved catalyst and process equipment technologies could lead to the process becoming profitable in the future. Future work for the process involves pilot scale testing of the reactor and the gravitational salt separator to test their feasibility on an industrial scale.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Chemical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleGasification of Algae for the Production of CNGen_US
dc.creatorRonan, Zachary Wayneen_US
dc.contributor.authorRonan, Zachary Wayneen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this project is to create compressed natural gas (CNG) from methane. This process is intended to serve as an environmentally friendly supplement to other sources of natural gas, such as the natural gas found alongside fossil fuels. Algae are to be converted into natural gas in supercritical water at an algae mass percent of 2.5%. The reactor uses a ruthenium catalyst on a carbon structure. The process is environmentally friendly because the carbon dioxide produced in the reactor and the furnace is recycled back to algae farms, thereby significantly reducing the net carbon dioxide emissions. Also, the salts that are removed from the algae are recycled to the algae farms thereby eliminating any potentially toxic byproducts. A process hazard analysis was completed to reduce any potential safety concerns involved with the process. An economic analysis was performed and the process was determined to not be economically viable at the current time. However, improved catalyst and process equipment technologies could lead to the process becoming profitable in the future. Future work for the process involves pilot scale testing of the reactor and the gravitational salt separator to test their feasibility on an industrial scale.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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