Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146230
Title:
The Effects of Overtraining on Updating of Human Episodic Memory
Author:
Weiss, Michael William
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Recent research has demonstrated that previously consolidated episodic memories reenter a labile state after being reactivated by contextual cues, making them susceptible to updating through reconsolidation (Hupbach et al. 2007; Hupbach et al. 2008). However, little is known about boundary conditions that limit reconsolidation in humans. The current study uses the list-learning paradigm established by Hupbach et al. to investigate the boundary of memory strength at 96 hour and 5 week time delays. Participants were overtrained on the initial object set, after which they returned for reactivation (or no reactivation) and learned a second object set. During the third session participants were asked to recall only one of the sets. Updating was assessed by measuring levels of intrusions from the alternate set into the memory of the correct set. Overtrained participants showed similar intrusion patterns to normally-trained participants despite increased correct recall, suggesting updating at 96 hours and no updating at 5 weeks. Implications of the results are discussed, including comparisons to recent animal neuroscience research.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Effects of Overtraining on Updating of Human Episodic Memoryen_US
dc.creatorWeiss, Michael Williamen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeiss, Michael Williamen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecent research has demonstrated that previously consolidated episodic memories reenter a labile state after being reactivated by contextual cues, making them susceptible to updating through reconsolidation (Hupbach et al. 2007; Hupbach et al. 2008). However, little is known about boundary conditions that limit reconsolidation in humans. The current study uses the list-learning paradigm established by Hupbach et al. to investigate the boundary of memory strength at 96 hour and 5 week time delays. Participants were overtrained on the initial object set, after which they returned for reactivation (or no reactivation) and learned a second object set. During the third session participants were asked to recall only one of the sets. Updating was assessed by measuring levels of intrusions from the alternate set into the memory of the correct set. Overtrained participants showed similar intrusion patterns to normally-trained participants despite increased correct recall, suggesting updating at 96 hours and no updating at 5 weeks. Implications of the results are discussed, including comparisons to recent animal neuroscience research.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.