Juvenile H1N1 Infections in Pima County: A Descriptive Study of Frequently Reported Symptoms and Co-morbidities for Children with Confirmed H1N1 Infections Within Pima County in 2009

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146225
Title:
Juvenile H1N1 Infections in Pima County: A Descriptive Study of Frequently Reported Symptoms and Co-morbidities for Children with Confirmed H1N1 Infections Within Pima County in 2009
Author:
Heller, Lauren Anne
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The study examined a random sample of juvenile H1N1 cases (ages 0 - 18 years) occurring within Pima County, Arizona from January 2009 through December 2009. The primary goal of the study was to develop a descriptive data set for the population, with an emphasis on data specific to the most common symptoms and co-morbidities of the children in the study. The second goal was to determine which co-morbidities, if any, led to a poorer outcome, or more severe case of flu in certain subjects. Data was gathered using the Pima County Health Department database. Interviews were conducted with the parents or guardians of the study subjects, as needed, to augment the data set. Data analysis revealed that the majority of H1N1 infections occurred in males. The most common ethnic origin of study subjects was Hispanic. The most common symptom of flu was fever and the most frequently observed co-morbidity was asthma. Co-morbidities, including asthma, seem to correlate with a more severe case of H1N1. On average, the most severe cases were observed in children with a mean age of 6.9 years. Due to difficulties collecting data from subjects that were not hospitalized, hospitalized cases may be over represented in the study. A follow-up study will be conducted throughout the summer in attempt to obtain additional data for the non-hospitalized sample.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Health Education (Community Education)
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleJuvenile H1N1 Infections in Pima County: A Descriptive Study of Frequently Reported Symptoms and Co-morbidities for Children with Confirmed H1N1 Infections Within Pima County in 2009en_US
dc.creatorHeller, Lauren Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorHeller, Lauren Anneen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe study examined a random sample of juvenile H1N1 cases (ages 0 - 18 years) occurring within Pima County, Arizona from January 2009 through December 2009. The primary goal of the study was to develop a descriptive data set for the population, with an emphasis on data specific to the most common symptoms and co-morbidities of the children in the study. The second goal was to determine which co-morbidities, if any, led to a poorer outcome, or more severe case of flu in certain subjects. Data was gathered using the Pima County Health Department database. Interviews were conducted with the parents or guardians of the study subjects, as needed, to augment the data set. Data analysis revealed that the majority of H1N1 infections occurred in males. The most common ethnic origin of study subjects was Hispanic. The most common symptom of flu was fever and the most frequently observed co-morbidity was asthma. Co-morbidities, including asthma, seem to correlate with a more severe case of H1N1. On average, the most severe cases were observed in children with a mean age of 6.9 years. Due to difficulties collecting data from subjects that were not hospitalized, hospitalized cases may be over represented in the study. A follow-up study will be conducted throughout the summer in attempt to obtain additional data for the non-hospitalized sample.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHealth Education (Community Education)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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