The Interrelationship of Local and Global Events and the Changing Ecological and Socio-economic States of the Sierra Tarahumara in Chihuahua, Mexico

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146224
Title:
The Interrelationship of Local and Global Events and the Changing Ecological and Socio-economic States of the Sierra Tarahumara in Chihuahua, Mexico
Author:
Garcia, Denise Tanya
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The productivity decline over the past century of the Sierra Madre of western Chihuahua, Mexico has impacted present and potential socio-economic conditions, placing more pressure for extractive use of forest products. Two independent theoretical frameworks may help to understand the intrinsic relationship between ecological and social system resilience and resource access under changing global climate and trade. The Panarchy Model of Gunderson and Holling (2002) describes a human-ecological system as a continuous cycle of a changing adaptive state. Sen?s Theory of Entitlements (1981) states that poverty and famines result from inequality in resource accessibility. On-site semi-structured key respondent interviews among the Tarahumara of the Sierra Madre Occidental (Municipio de Guachochi, Chihuahua, Mexico) yielded a longitudinal (1970 - 2010) profile of socio-economic and environmental dynamics. The compilation of local knowledge uncovered the complexity of ecological and socio-economic cycles and the sometimes overwhelming influence of global and local events. Applying both theoretical frameworks revealed the adaptive resilience and vulnerabilities within this coupled human-natural system. Insight on the complexity of the dynamics of socio-economic and ecological interconnectedness, potential and access suggests the application of these frameworks would be useful to development challenges and crisis management projects in communities around the world.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Interdisciplinary Studies/International Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Interrelationship of Local and Global Events and the Changing Ecological and Socio-economic States of the Sierra Tarahumara in Chihuahua, Mexicoen_US
dc.creatorGarcia, Denise Tanyaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Denise Tanyaen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe productivity decline over the past century of the Sierra Madre of western Chihuahua, Mexico has impacted present and potential socio-economic conditions, placing more pressure for extractive use of forest products. Two independent theoretical frameworks may help to understand the intrinsic relationship between ecological and social system resilience and resource access under changing global climate and trade. The Panarchy Model of Gunderson and Holling (2002) describes a human-ecological system as a continuous cycle of a changing adaptive state. Sen?s Theory of Entitlements (1981) states that poverty and famines result from inequality in resource accessibility. On-site semi-structured key respondent interviews among the Tarahumara of the Sierra Madre Occidental (Municipio de Guachochi, Chihuahua, Mexico) yielded a longitudinal (1970 - 2010) profile of socio-economic and environmental dynamics. The compilation of local knowledge uncovered the complexity of ecological and socio-economic cycles and the sometimes overwhelming influence of global and local events. Applying both theoretical frameworks revealed the adaptive resilience and vulnerabilities within this coupled human-natural system. Insight on the complexity of the dynamics of socio-economic and ecological interconnectedness, potential and access suggests the application of these frameworks would be useful to development challenges and crisis management projects in communities around the world.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInterdisciplinary Studies/International Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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