Human Skin and Tissue Phantoms in Optical Software: Engineering Design and Future Medical Applications

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146219
Title:
Human Skin and Tissue Phantoms in Optical Software: Engineering Design and Future Medical Applications
Author:
Stevenson, Michael Allen
Issue Date:
May-2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Recent breakthroughs in Breault Research Organization's ASAP® optical software have resulted in a highly accurate method for skin and tissue modeling via the Henyey-Greenstein approximation for the angular distribution of scattered light and the radiative-transport equation. Four parameters are key to the model: the anisotropy factor (g), the scattering coefficient (μs), the absorption coefficient (μa), and the fractional obscuration per unit area (f) -- the former three of which are wavelength (λ) dependent. The wavelength dependence of light-absorbing and scattering molecules, including eumelanin, pheomelanin, deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin, bilirubin, beta carotene, and water is known over the wavelength range from 250 nanometers to 1 micron. The ASAP Realistic Skin Model™ and Tissue Generator have enabled virtual modeling for a wide range of tissue-optics problems. Researchers may now simulate light interactions in the stratum corneum, epidermis, dermis, and hypodermis of human skin -- with provisions for hair, blood vessel, dermal papillae, and fluorescence characterization -- as well as single and multilayer tissue models based on bulk-scattering approximations. Commercial applications for these models include medical-device design and treatment-efficacy studies involving light delivery and detection. Future applications may include real-time monitoring of bio-optical phenomena, and patient-specific pre-treatment studies for cancer and other diseases for which light-based therapies are emerging.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Molecular and Cellular Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleHuman Skin and Tissue Phantoms in Optical Software: Engineering Design and Future Medical Applicationsen_US
dc.creatorStevenson, Michael Allenen_US
dc.contributor.authorStevenson, Michael Allenen_US
dc.date.issued2009-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecent breakthroughs in Breault Research Organization's ASAP® optical software have resulted in a highly accurate method for skin and tissue modeling via the Henyey-Greenstein approximation for the angular distribution of scattered light and the radiative-transport equation. Four parameters are key to the model: the anisotropy factor (g), the scattering coefficient (μs), the absorption coefficient (μa), and the fractional obscuration per unit area (f) -- the former three of which are wavelength (λ) dependent. The wavelength dependence of light-absorbing and scattering molecules, including eumelanin, pheomelanin, deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin, bilirubin, beta carotene, and water is known over the wavelength range from 250 nanometers to 1 micron. The ASAP Realistic Skin Model™ and Tissue Generator have enabled virtual modeling for a wide range of tissue-optics problems. Researchers may now simulate light interactions in the stratum corneum, epidermis, dermis, and hypodermis of human skin -- with provisions for hair, blood vessel, dermal papillae, and fluorescence characterization -- as well as single and multilayer tissue models based on bulk-scattering approximations. Commercial applications for these models include medical-device design and treatment-efficacy studies involving light delivery and detection. Future applications may include real-time monitoring of bio-optical phenomena, and patient-specific pre-treatment studies for cancer and other diseases for which light-based therapies are emerging.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular and Cellular Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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