Effects of a Short-term Group Fitness Intervention on Body Composition and Exercise Motivation in College Students

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146199
Title:
Effects of a Short-term Group Fitness Intervention on Body Composition and Exercise Motivation in College Students
Author:
Hamre, Megan
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to test the impact of a short-term group fitness intervention on body weight, percent body fat, and attitude toward physical activity in college students. Twenty sedentary students (mean age 20.4 +/- 1.4 yr) were classified as healthy, normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m^2) or overweight (BMI >25 kg/m^2), and then randomized into exercise and control groups. The exercise group participated in four aerobic fitness classes per week for 4 weeks, while the control subjects remained sedentary. Percent body fat was measured by BodPod and attitude toward physical activity was measured via questionnaire (Martin Questionnaire) at baseline and the end of the study. Using univariate analysis of variance, we found significant differences in change in percent body fat between the healthy-control and overweight-control groups (- 1.1 +/- 0.8 vs. 1.8 +/- 0.9%, P=0.034) and between the healthy-exercise and the overweight-control groups (-2.2 +/- 1.0 vs. 1.8 +/- 0.9%, P=0.010). These findings support the notion that even at a young age, overweight individuals are more susceptible to weight gain and may need increased amounts of exercise or encouragement in addition to restricted diets to produce weight loss. Using the motivation questions, 80% of participants reported that group fitness provided motivation to continue exercise.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Nutritional Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEffects of a Short-term Group Fitness Intervention on Body Composition and Exercise Motivation in College Studentsen_US
dc.creatorHamre, Meganen_US
dc.contributor.authorHamre, Meganen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to test the impact of a short-term group fitness intervention on body weight, percent body fat, and attitude toward physical activity in college students. Twenty sedentary students (mean age 20.4 +/- 1.4 yr) were classified as healthy, normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m^2) or overweight (BMI >25 kg/m^2), and then randomized into exercise and control groups. The exercise group participated in four aerobic fitness classes per week for 4 weeks, while the control subjects remained sedentary. Percent body fat was measured by BodPod and attitude toward physical activity was measured via questionnaire (Martin Questionnaire) at baseline and the end of the study. Using univariate analysis of variance, we found significant differences in change in percent body fat between the healthy-control and overweight-control groups (- 1.1 +/- 0.8 vs. 1.8 +/- 0.9%, P=0.034) and between the healthy-exercise and the overweight-control groups (-2.2 +/- 1.0 vs. 1.8 +/- 0.9%, P=0.010). These findings support the notion that even at a young age, overweight individuals are more susceptible to weight gain and may need increased amounts of exercise or encouragement in addition to restricted diets to produce weight loss. Using the motivation questions, 80% of participants reported that group fitness provided motivation to continue exercise.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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