LOS PRIMEROS MEXICANOS: LATE PLEISTOCENE/EARLY HOLOCENE ARCHAEOLOGY OF SONORA, MEXICO

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146069
Title:
LOS PRIMEROS MEXICANOS: LATE PLEISTOCENE/EARLY HOLOCENE ARCHAEOLOGY OF SONORA, MEXICO
Author:
Sanchez de Carpenter, Maria Guadalupe
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Embargo: Release after 12/4/2011
Abstract:
The archaeological record of the first Americans in Mexico is poorly known and somewhat confusing. However, the state of Sonora presents a remarkably pristine setting for studying the late Pleistocene occupation of North America. The early archaeological record in Sonora is stunning in terms of its relative abundance and only within the past ten years has this fact become evident. The Paleo-Indian sites are concentrated in north-central Sonora on and surrounding, the Llanos de Hermosillo. The settlement pattern appears to indicate that Clovis groups were generalized hunter and gatherers that exploited a wide range of environments, and their diet was based upon a wide variety of foodstuffs. The Clovis groups of Sonora developed a sophisticated settlement pattern and land use determined by the location of lithic sources for tool making, water sources, large prey animals and a mosaic of edible plants and small animals. Exploiting an extensive territory probably permitted them to remain in the same region for longer periods of time. The presence of only few late Paleo-Indian diagnostic points could represent the decrease of population density in Sonora, but most likely it is an indication that after Clovis a regionalization of the hunter and gather groups took place in Sonora. The Sonoran Clovis occupation is a testimony that multiple regional Clovis adaptations emerged each with specific responses of plants, animals and resources.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Clovis; Gomphoterium; Lithic technology; Mexico; Paleo-Indian; Sonora
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fish, Paul R.; Holliday, Vance T.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLOS PRIMEROS MEXICANOS: LATE PLEISTOCENE/EARLY HOLOCENE ARCHAEOLOGY OF SONORA, MEXICOen_US
dc.creatorSanchez de Carpenter, Maria Guadalupeen_US
dc.contributor.authorSanchez de Carpenter, Maria Guadalupeen_US
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseEmbargo: Release after 12/4/2011en_US
dc.description.abstractThe archaeological record of the first Americans in Mexico is poorly known and somewhat confusing. However, the state of Sonora presents a remarkably pristine setting for studying the late Pleistocene occupation of North America. The early archaeological record in Sonora is stunning in terms of its relative abundance and only within the past ten years has this fact become evident. The Paleo-Indian sites are concentrated in north-central Sonora on and surrounding, the Llanos de Hermosillo. The settlement pattern appears to indicate that Clovis groups were generalized hunter and gatherers that exploited a wide range of environments, and their diet was based upon a wide variety of foodstuffs. The Clovis groups of Sonora developed a sophisticated settlement pattern and land use determined by the location of lithic sources for tool making, water sources, large prey animals and a mosaic of edible plants and small animals. Exploiting an extensive territory probably permitted them to remain in the same region for longer periods of time. The presence of only few late Paleo-Indian diagnostic points could represent the decrease of population density in Sonora, but most likely it is an indication that after Clovis a regionalization of the hunter and gather groups took place in Sonora. The Sonoran Clovis occupation is a testimony that multiple regional Clovis adaptations emerged each with specific responses of plants, animals and resources.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectClovisen_US
dc.subjectGomphoteriumen_US
dc.subjectLithic technologyen_US
dc.subjectMexicoen_US
dc.subjectPaleo-Indianen_US
dc.subjectSonoraen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFish, Paul R.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorHolliday, Vance T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFish, Paul R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHolliday, Vance T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHaynes, C. Vance, Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOlson, John W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10916-
dc.identifier.oclc659754814-
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