Electrophysiological Responses of Rostral Versus Caudal Ventral Tegmental Neurons

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146056
Title:
Electrophysiological Responses of Rostral Versus Caudal Ventral Tegmental Neurons
Author:
Egurrola, Ana Martina
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Accumulating evidence suggests that neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are highly correlated with event salience. Different regions of the VTA have different projection sites, yet little is known about the VTA response across its rostro-caudal axis. High-density recording methods were used to monitor cells from the rostral and caudal VTA of adult male rats as they ran for food reward. Reward magnitude was unexpectedly changed during recording sessions. We confirm the sensitivity of VTA neurons to reward and reward magnitude. Furthermore, we observed three 'classes' of VTA neurons: 1) neurons with gradual firing rate changes following reward delivery; 2) neurons with steep changes; and 3) neurons with no response to reward. Within these categories, neurons exhibited one of two different waveforms. While the broad responses to reward delivery were present in both VTA regions, the rostral VTA had a significantly higher proportion of cells with steep response characteristics. Finally, rostral VTA neurons with no response to reward exhibited firing rate changes when reward contingencies were altered. Caudal VTA neurons did not show this property. These results suggest that the VTA exhibits heterogeneous responses to reward which may have important implications for processing in structures receiving differential VTA output.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleElectrophysiological Responses of Rostral Versus Caudal Ventral Tegmental Neuronsen_US
dc.creatorEgurrola, Ana Martinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorEgurrola, Ana Martinaen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAccumulating evidence suggests that neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are highly correlated with event salience. Different regions of the VTA have different projection sites, yet little is known about the VTA response across its rostro-caudal axis. High-density recording methods were used to monitor cells from the rostral and caudal VTA of adult male rats as they ran for food reward. Reward magnitude was unexpectedly changed during recording sessions. We confirm the sensitivity of VTA neurons to reward and reward magnitude. Furthermore, we observed three 'classes' of VTA neurons: 1) neurons with gradual firing rate changes following reward delivery; 2) neurons with steep changes; and 3) neurons with no response to reward. Within these categories, neurons exhibited one of two different waveforms. While the broad responses to reward delivery were present in both VTA regions, the rostral VTA had a significantly higher proportion of cells with steep response characteristics. Finally, rostral VTA neurons with no response to reward exhibited firing rate changes when reward contingencies were altered. Caudal VTA neurons did not show this property. These results suggest that the VTA exhibits heterogeneous responses to reward which may have important implications for processing in structures receiving differential VTA output.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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