Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146049
Title:
Globalization and the Expansion of the Contact Zone
Author:
Clayton, Steven Mikell
Issue Date:
Apr-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
On the whole, humans today regard themselves as more interconnected with people all over the world. With this comes the question "How can I help?" resounding throughout society and the media. What can I do to make the world a better place? Whether it involves travelling to another country to construct shelters, or something as simple as donating money to people deprived of food or devastated by a natural disaster, people everywhere are recognizing their responsibility to the less fortunate people. This is one of the effects of globalization. As a loosely defined term coming after the Cold War and dramatically assisted by the influence of technological advancements, globalization is a newer mindset that favors global thinking outside of political boundaries. As Dr. Hans Schattle of Roger Williams University defines it, "Rather than emerging as a noun indicating fixed membership status or permanent transfers of authority and allegiance from the nation-state to the world, global citizenship now emerges as a verb, a concept of action signifying ways of thinking and living within multiple cross-cutting communities" (3).
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleGlobalization and the Expansion of the Contact Zoneen_US
dc.creatorClayton, Steven Mikellen_US
dc.contributor.authorClayton, Steven Mikellen_US
dc.date.issued2010-04-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOn the whole, humans today regard themselves as more interconnected with people all over the world. With this comes the question "How can I help?" resounding throughout society and the media. What can I do to make the world a better place? Whether it involves travelling to another country to construct shelters, or something as simple as donating money to people deprived of food or devastated by a natural disaster, people everywhere are recognizing their responsibility to the less fortunate people. This is one of the effects of globalization. As a loosely defined term coming after the Cold War and dramatically assisted by the influence of technological advancements, globalization is a newer mindset that favors global thinking outside of political boundaries. As Dr. Hans Schattle of Roger Williams University defines it, "Rather than emerging as a noun indicating fixed membership status or permanent transfers of authority and allegiance from the nation-state to the world, global citizenship now emerges as a verb, a concept of action signifying ways of thinking and living within multiple cross-cutting communities" (3).en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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