The Molding of the Moral Man: The United States Civil Religion's Form and Use in Public Education

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146032
Title:
The Molding of the Moral Man: The United States Civil Religion's Form and Use in Public Education
Author:
Gannon, Molly Elizabeth
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This intention of this paper is to examine the impact of national perceptions of morality on the curriculum and function of the United States public school system. It begins by studying the original purpose of the public school, which was to maintain a functional republic by educating citizens in a basic form of moral and academic knowledge. This attempt needed to be balanced with the republican ideal of free speech, which prevented the state from adopting the moral views of a particular religion. The melding of free speech and universal education resulted in a general civil religion which encapsulated what the state believed to be the necessary moral ideals required for a functioning republic. The paper goes on to examine how changing cultural perceptions have resulted in a shift in the civil religion towards a more general form of morality. This shift, coupled with increased diversity of moral opinion within the United States, has resulted in public education becoming a less universal mode of distributing republican ideals than its founders had originally intended.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Religious Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Molding of the Moral Man: The United States Civil Religion's Form and Use in Public Educationen_US
dc.creatorGannon, Molly Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorGannon, Molly Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis intention of this paper is to examine the impact of national perceptions of morality on the curriculum and function of the United States public school system. It begins by studying the original purpose of the public school, which was to maintain a functional republic by educating citizens in a basic form of moral and academic knowledge. This attempt needed to be balanced with the republican ideal of free speech, which prevented the state from adopting the moral views of a particular religion. The melding of free speech and universal education resulted in a general civil religion which encapsulated what the state believed to be the necessary moral ideals required for a functioning republic. The paper goes on to examine how changing cultural perceptions have resulted in a shift in the civil religion towards a more general form of morality. This shift, coupled with increased diversity of moral opinion within the United States, has resulted in public education becoming a less universal mode of distributing republican ideals than its founders had originally intended.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineReligious Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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