Facebook and Personality: What Do Status Updates Really Communicate?

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146024
Title:
Facebook and Personality: What Do Status Updates Really Communicate?
Author:
Jarvis, Margaret Mary
Issue Date:
Apr-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Facebook is a social networking site used by many people. A popular feature of Facebook is status updates; which are spontaneous, momentary "mini-blogs" used to describe thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Past research (Back, et. al, 2010) suggests that people can make fairly accurate first impressions about someone's personality based on Facebook. This suggests that Facebook profiles convey information about personality and we argue that status updates communicate information about psychological well-being. The purpose of the study is to look at how well judges can detect personality traits and depression based on Facebook pages. 126 participants saved three months of retrospective activity from their Facebook pages and completed the Big Five Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory. Five judges made ratings of personality and depression from the pages. The results revealed that judges gauged personality and depression with a significant degree of accuracy. Evidence for depressive symptomology in status updates was found - with trait impression management moderating the findings. This study has implications for other people (e.g. friends, counselors) being able to recognize depression through status updates and make accurate first impressions about their personality through Facebook.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFacebook and Personality: What Do Status Updates Really Communicate?en_US
dc.creatorJarvis, Margaret Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorJarvis, Margaret Maryen_US
dc.date.issued2010-04-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFacebook is a social networking site used by many people. A popular feature of Facebook is status updates; which are spontaneous, momentary "mini-blogs" used to describe thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Past research (Back, et. al, 2010) suggests that people can make fairly accurate first impressions about someone's personality based on Facebook. This suggests that Facebook profiles convey information about personality and we argue that status updates communicate information about psychological well-being. The purpose of the study is to look at how well judges can detect personality traits and depression based on Facebook pages. 126 participants saved three months of retrospective activity from their Facebook pages and completed the Big Five Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory. Five judges made ratings of personality and depression from the pages. The results revealed that judges gauged personality and depression with a significant degree of accuracy. Evidence for depressive symptomology in status updates was found - with trait impression management moderating the findings. This study has implications for other people (e.g. friends, counselors) being able to recognize depression through status updates and make accurate first impressions about their personality through Facebook.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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