Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146023
Title:
The Role of the Cytokine CSF-1 in Ovarian Tumor Cell Motility
Author:
Dougherty, Sarah Louise
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of death in women because it?s late presentation and aggressive metastasis result in a poor prognosis. The CSF-1 ligand and its receptor cfms have been linked to the motility and invasion of cells in both normal and cancerous environments. The purpose of this study is to understand the role that CSF-1 plays in mediating motility in ovarian cancer cells. CSF-1 was knocked-down in Hey and SKOV3 ovarian cancer lines by the transfection of anti-CSF-1 shRNA. A transwell migration assay was then used to visualize and quantify changes in cell motility. Both cell lines showed a drastic decrease in cell motility as compared to empty vector or scramble vector controls as well as untransfected cells. This data suggests that CSF-1 plays a role in tumor cell motility. Motility is the first step that a cell must take as it metastasizes. If motility and subsequently invasion could be halted, metastasis of ovarian tumor cells to secondary sites could be slowed or stopped. Further investigation of CSF-1 is necessary and important in understanding the mechanism by which cells move. Such knowledge may lead to CSF-1 being an attractive translational, therapeutic target in the treatment of ovarian cancer.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Molecular and Cellular Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Role of the Cytokine CSF-1 in Ovarian Tumor Cell Motilityen_US
dc.creatorDougherty, Sarah Louiseen_US
dc.contributor.authorDougherty, Sarah Louiseen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOvarian cancer is a leading cause of death in women because it?s late presentation and aggressive metastasis result in a poor prognosis. The CSF-1 ligand and its receptor cfms have been linked to the motility and invasion of cells in both normal and cancerous environments. The purpose of this study is to understand the role that CSF-1 plays in mediating motility in ovarian cancer cells. CSF-1 was knocked-down in Hey and SKOV3 ovarian cancer lines by the transfection of anti-CSF-1 shRNA. A transwell migration assay was then used to visualize and quantify changes in cell motility. Both cell lines showed a drastic decrease in cell motility as compared to empty vector or scramble vector controls as well as untransfected cells. This data suggests that CSF-1 plays a role in tumor cell motility. Motility is the first step that a cell must take as it metastasizes. If motility and subsequently invasion could be halted, metastasis of ovarian tumor cells to secondary sites could be slowed or stopped. Further investigation of CSF-1 is necessary and important in understanding the mechanism by which cells move. Such knowledge may lead to CSF-1 being an attractive translational, therapeutic target in the treatment of ovarian cancer.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular and Cellular Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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