No Calpain, No Gain: Newly Developed Procedures for the Separation and Characterization of The Calpain Family of Proteins in Human Dystrophic and Non-dystophic Muscle

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/146022
Title:
No Calpain, No Gain: Newly Developed Procedures for the Separation and Characterization of The Calpain Family of Proteins in Human Dystrophic and Non-dystophic Muscle
Author:
Pasalic, Dario
Issue Date:
May-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Muscular dystrophy is a disease which gradually deteriorates skeletal muscle cells, leading to the eventual death of such cells and the surrounding tissue. Calpains are Ca2+- dependent proteases and together with the Ca2+-dependent specific inhibitor of calpains, calpastatin, are widely distributed in eukaryotic cells. It has been suggested that part of the enhanced deterioration in the dystrophic state is due to enhanced calpain activity; therefore analysis of normal and dystrophic muscle was essential. Conventional techniques for the isolation and characterization of calpain and calpastatin utilize relatively large muscle samples (>100g), whereas biopsy or post-mortem samples are considerably less than this. Thus, the initial and main objective of this project was to develop methods suitable for purification and analysis of the calpain family from limited muscle samples. With these restrictions in mind, techniques were developed for samples ranging from 0.2-1g, a realistic biopsy extraction. The hypothesis to be further evaluated is that some dystrophies are characterized by increased calpain activity, caused either by an increased expression of m- or μ- calpain or decreased inhibition by calpastatin, or both. The procedures are now in place to test this hypothesis further and extensive analyses are required using defined dystrophic types and increased sampling numbers.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleNo Calpain, No Gain: Newly Developed Procedures for the Separation and Characterization of The Calpain Family of Proteins in Human Dystrophic and Non-dystophic Muscleen_US
dc.creatorPasalic, Darioen_US
dc.contributor.authorPasalic, Darioen_US
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMuscular dystrophy is a disease which gradually deteriorates skeletal muscle cells, leading to the eventual death of such cells and the surrounding tissue. Calpains are Ca2+- dependent proteases and together with the Ca2+-dependent specific inhibitor of calpains, calpastatin, are widely distributed in eukaryotic cells. It has been suggested that part of the enhanced deterioration in the dystrophic state is due to enhanced calpain activity; therefore analysis of normal and dystrophic muscle was essential. Conventional techniques for the isolation and characterization of calpain and calpastatin utilize relatively large muscle samples (>100g), whereas biopsy or post-mortem samples are considerably less than this. Thus, the initial and main objective of this project was to develop methods suitable for purification and analysis of the calpain family from limited muscle samples. With these restrictions in mind, techniques were developed for samples ranging from 0.2-1g, a realistic biopsy extraction. The hypothesis to be further evaluated is that some dystrophies are characterized by increased calpain activity, caused either by an increased expression of m- or μ- calpain or decreased inhibition by calpastatin, or both. The procedures are now in place to test this hypothesis further and extensive analyses are required using defined dystrophic types and increased sampling numbers.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiochemistry and Molecular Biophysicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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