A VARIETY OF SLOW-LIGHT TECHNOLOGIES IN NONLINEAR DISPERSIVE MEDIA

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145736
Title:
A VARIETY OF SLOW-LIGHT TECHNOLOGIES IN NONLINEAR DISPERSIVE MEDIA
Author:
Lee, Myungjun
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Embargo: Release after 3/24/2011
Abstract:
Over the past few years, researchers have directed a significant amount of effort towards realizing tunable all-optical devices using nonlinear optical methods. It is now possible to exercise dynamic control of the group velocity of light traveling through a wide variety of material systems. The slow and fast light refer to situations in which the group velocity íg of an optical pulse through a dispersive material can be made to be smaller and larger, respectively, than the phase velocity vp = c/n. This ability could overcome the remaining challenge in current optical networks of storing and manipulating an optical signal directly in optical domain so as to avoid a bottleneck due to optical-to-electrical (O/E) and electrical-to-optical (E/O) conversions. The overall purpose of the dissertation is to study novel slow-light systems that provide controlled generation of large pulse delays relative to the pulse width with minimal pulse shape distortion by optimally design resonance profiles of such systems. The system design studies utilize several measures of performance such as the fractional delay, power throughput, and signal distortion under the limited system resource constraints. To this end, powerful data fidelity metrics are required to quantify the performance of tunable delay devices. Here, a new framework for measuring an information velocity and throughput is described and implemented using Shannon mutual information concepts. This new technique is used to investigate trends, trade-offs, and limits in slow light devices, which are physically sensible and in good agreement with analyses obtained using a conventional eye-opening(EO) metric. Using these information-theoretic and/or conventional metrics, we present the quantifying performance of gain-based stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) system in optical fibers as well as optical passive devices such as Fabry-Perot, fiber Bragg gratings, and ring resonators. It is shown that combining the SBS gain medium with these passive devices can compensate their respective disadvantages and thus increase delay performance without using additional resource of SBS pump power. The results show the possibility of achieving a fractional delay up to 10 at a signal bandwidth up to tens of GHz.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Dispersion; Information theory; Non-linear optics; Optical tunable buffer; Slow light
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Electrical & Computer Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Neifeld, Mark A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA VARIETY OF SLOW-LIGHT TECHNOLOGIES IN NONLINEAR DISPERSIVE MEDIAen_US
dc.creatorLee, Myungjunen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Myungjunen_US
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseEmbargo: Release after 3/24/2011en_US
dc.description.abstractOver the past few years, researchers have directed a significant amount of effort towards realizing tunable all-optical devices using nonlinear optical methods. It is now possible to exercise dynamic control of the group velocity of light traveling through a wide variety of material systems. The slow and fast light refer to situations in which the group velocity íg of an optical pulse through a dispersive material can be made to be smaller and larger, respectively, than the phase velocity vp = c/n. This ability could overcome the remaining challenge in current optical networks of storing and manipulating an optical signal directly in optical domain so as to avoid a bottleneck due to optical-to-electrical (O/E) and electrical-to-optical (E/O) conversions. The overall purpose of the dissertation is to study novel slow-light systems that provide controlled generation of large pulse delays relative to the pulse width with minimal pulse shape distortion by optimally design resonance profiles of such systems. The system design studies utilize several measures of performance such as the fractional delay, power throughput, and signal distortion under the limited system resource constraints. To this end, powerful data fidelity metrics are required to quantify the performance of tunable delay devices. Here, a new framework for measuring an information velocity and throughput is described and implemented using Shannon mutual information concepts. This new technique is used to investigate trends, trade-offs, and limits in slow light devices, which are physically sensible and in good agreement with analyses obtained using a conventional eye-opening(EO) metric. Using these information-theoretic and/or conventional metrics, we present the quantifying performance of gain-based stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) system in optical fibers as well as optical passive devices such as Fabry-Perot, fiber Bragg gratings, and ring resonators. It is shown that combining the SBS gain medium with these passive devices can compensate their respective disadvantages and thus increase delay performance without using additional resource of SBS pump power. The results show the possibility of achieving a fractional delay up to 10 at a signal bandwidth up to tens of GHz.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectDispersionen_US
dc.subjectInformation theoryen_US
dc.subjectNon-linear opticsen_US
dc.subjectOptical tunable bufferen_US
dc.subjectSlow lighten_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical & Computer Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNeifeld, Mark A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKostuk, Raymonden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDjordjevic, Ivanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPau, Stanleyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11388-
dc.identifier.oclc752261254-
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