Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145733
Title:
Evolution and Function of an Aphid Facultative Symbiont
Author:
Burke, Gaelen R.
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Embargo: Release after 5/5/2011
Abstract:
Hereditary bacterial symbiosis is a common mechanism by which eukaryotic hosts can acquire traits beneficial for their fitness. Many insects have symbiotic associations with bacteria that trace back millions of years, whose function and evolution are well characterized. Insects can also possess more recently derived symbionts that are closely related to free-living bacteria, and often play a role in host defense. Serratia symbiotica is a recently derived symbiont that infects aphids and provides protection against heat stress, and possibly also plays a nutritional role. Many aspects of the biology of recent symbionts are less well studied, including the diversity of functional roles and evolution among hosts for single lineages of symbionts, the molecular mechanisms that contribute to defense, the early stages of symbiont genome evolution, and interactions with hosts. This dissertation focuses upon S. symbiotica to contribute research addressing each of these themes. Functional studies revealed that S. symbiotica lysis during heat-shock is correlated with protection of the nutritional symbiont Buchnera , and that S. symbiotica has a large effect upon aphid metabolite pools. Despite this large metabolic effect, S. symbiotica does not seem to dramatically influence expression of aphid genes, including those involved in immunity. Analysis of the evolution of S. symbiotica lineages in different aphid hosts revealed this symbiont is common in the aphid subfamily Lachninae, but did not support the obligate nutritional role hypothesized in the literature for this group. Finally, comparison of the S. symbiotica genome to close free-living relatives revealed a genome undergoing massive decay, and provided a rare opportunity to examine the evolution of a recently acquired symbiont.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
aphid; Buchnera; genomics; Serratia symbiotica; symbiosis
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Moran, Nancy A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEvolution and Function of an Aphid Facultative Symbionten_US
dc.creatorBurke, Gaelen R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Gaelen R.en_US
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseEmbargo: Release after 5/5/2011en_US
dc.description.abstractHereditary bacterial symbiosis is a common mechanism by which eukaryotic hosts can acquire traits beneficial for their fitness. Many insects have symbiotic associations with bacteria that trace back millions of years, whose function and evolution are well characterized. Insects can also possess more recently derived symbionts that are closely related to free-living bacteria, and often play a role in host defense. Serratia symbiotica is a recently derived symbiont that infects aphids and provides protection against heat stress, and possibly also plays a nutritional role. Many aspects of the biology of recent symbionts are less well studied, including the diversity of functional roles and evolution among hosts for single lineages of symbionts, the molecular mechanisms that contribute to defense, the early stages of symbiont genome evolution, and interactions with hosts. This dissertation focuses upon S. symbiotica to contribute research addressing each of these themes. Functional studies revealed that S. symbiotica lysis during heat-shock is correlated with protection of the nutritional symbiont Buchnera , and that S. symbiotica has a large effect upon aphid metabolite pools. Despite this large metabolic effect, S. symbiotica does not seem to dramatically influence expression of aphid genes, including those involved in immunity. Analysis of the evolution of S. symbiotica lineages in different aphid hosts revealed this symbiont is common in the aphid subfamily Lachninae, but did not support the obligate nutritional role hypothesized in the literature for this group. Finally, comparison of the S. symbiotica genome to close free-living relatives revealed a genome undergoing massive decay, and provided a rare opportunity to examine the evolution of a recently acquired symbiont.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectaphiden_US
dc.subjectBuchneraen_US
dc.subjectgenomicsen_US
dc.subjectSerratia symbioticaen_US
dc.subjectsymbiosisen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMoran, Nancy A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoran, Nancy A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHunter, Martha S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWorobey, Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11288-
dc.identifier.oclc752261133-
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