EFFECTS OF LAND USE / LAND COVER CHANGE ON THE HYDROLOGICAL PARTITIONING

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145730
Title:
EFFECTS OF LAND USE / LAND COVER CHANGE ON THE HYDROLOGICAL PARTITIONING
Author:
Guardiola-Claramonte, Maria Teresa
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Embargo: Release after 10/13/2011
Abstract:
Current global population growth and economic development accelerates the land cover conversion in many parts of the world and compromises the natural environment. However, the impacts of this land cover change on the hydrologic cycle at local to regional scales are poorly understood. The thesis presented here investigates the hydrologic implications of land use conversion in two different settings using two different approaches. The first study focuses in Southeast Asia and the expansion of rubber monocultures in a middle-sized basin. Field measurements suggest rubber has distinct dynamics compared to the area's native vegetation, depleting and exhausting the local water balance more than native vegetation. A phenology based evapotranspiration function is developed and used in a hillslope based hydrologic model to predict the implications of rubber expansion at a basin scale. The second study is centered in the semi-arid southwestern United States. This study challenges the traditional assumption that deforestation increases water yield at regional scales. Observations of water yield in basins affected by a regional piñon pine die-off show a decline in water yield during several years after die-off. These results suggest an increase in landscape sensitivity to vegetation disruption in semi-arid ecosystems as scale increases. Consequences of both studies have important implications for land and water managers in these different ecosystems.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Drought; Land use change; Mortality; Pinyon; Rubber; Vegetation dynamics
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Hydrology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Troch, Peter A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEFFECTS OF LAND USE / LAND COVER CHANGE ON THE HYDROLOGICAL PARTITIONINGen_US
dc.creatorGuardiola-Claramonte, Maria Teresaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuardiola-Claramonte, Maria Teresaen_US
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseEmbargo: Release after 10/13/2011en_US
dc.description.abstractCurrent global population growth and economic development accelerates the land cover conversion in many parts of the world and compromises the natural environment. However, the impacts of this land cover change on the hydrologic cycle at local to regional scales are poorly understood. The thesis presented here investigates the hydrologic implications of land use conversion in two different settings using two different approaches. The first study focuses in Southeast Asia and the expansion of rubber monocultures in a middle-sized basin. Field measurements suggest rubber has distinct dynamics compared to the area's native vegetation, depleting and exhausting the local water balance more than native vegetation. A phenology based evapotranspiration function is developed and used in a hillslope based hydrologic model to predict the implications of rubber expansion at a basin scale. The second study is centered in the semi-arid southwestern United States. This study challenges the traditional assumption that deforestation increases water yield at regional scales. Observations of water yield in basins affected by a regional piñon pine die-off show a decline in water yield during several years after die-off. These results suggest an increase in landscape sensitivity to vegetation disruption in semi-arid ecosystems as scale increases. Consequences of both studies have important implications for land and water managers in these different ecosystems.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectDroughten_US
dc.subjectLand use changeen_US
dc.subjectMortalityen_US
dc.subjectPinyonen_US
dc.subjectRubberen_US
dc.subjectVegetation dynamicsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTroch, Peter A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFerre, Paul A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShuttleworth, Williams J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRasmussen, Craigen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGiambelluca, Thomas W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10775-
dc.identifier.oclc752260940-
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