Rule-Governed Behavior: Investigating a Structural Model of Influences on Adherence to Rules

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145591
Title:
Rule-Governed Behavior: Investigating a Structural Model of Influences on Adherence to Rules
Author:
Gladden, Paul Robert
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Behavior-analytic accounts of rule-adherence behavior suggest that rule-governance is a general class of functional (i.e., instrumental) behavior maintained by social consequences (Baum, 2005; Malott & Suarez, 2004; Jacobs et al., in prep.). Evolutionary Life-History (LH) theory suggests that LH strategy may underlie variation in rule-adherence behavior. Based on an integration of these two theories, a theoretical structural model of rule-governance was developed and tested. The structure of this model was used to develop follow-up experiments to test particularly salient links in the model. Consistent with theory, the structural model indicated that slow LH strategy directly and indirectly (through increased moral emotions and increased executive functioning) contributed to strength of rule-governance. Two experiments failed to replicate previously demonstrated effects of executive function depletion or moral identity priming (on moral behavioral outcome measures). Further, self-report measures of slow LH strategy, executive functioning, and rule-governance did not predict prosocial (donating) or rule-defiance (cheating) behavior in laboratory tasks. The limitations of relying solely on either self-report or behavioral tasks of unknown external validity are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Executive Function; Life History Theory; Moral Emotions; Moral Judgment; Obedience to Authority; Rule-Governance
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jacobs, W. Jake; Figueredo, Aurelio J

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRule-Governed Behavior: Investigating a Structural Model of Influences on Adherence to Rulesen_US
dc.creatorGladden, Paul Roberten_US
dc.contributor.authorGladden, Paul Roberten_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBehavior-analytic accounts of rule-adherence behavior suggest that rule-governance is a general class of functional (i.e., instrumental) behavior maintained by social consequences (Baum, 2005; Malott & Suarez, 2004; Jacobs et al., in prep.). Evolutionary Life-History (LH) theory suggests that LH strategy may underlie variation in rule-adherence behavior. Based on an integration of these two theories, a theoretical structural model of rule-governance was developed and tested. The structure of this model was used to develop follow-up experiments to test particularly salient links in the model. Consistent with theory, the structural model indicated that slow LH strategy directly and indirectly (through increased moral emotions and increased executive functioning) contributed to strength of rule-governance. Two experiments failed to replicate previously demonstrated effects of executive function depletion or moral identity priming (on moral behavioral outcome measures). Further, self-report measures of slow LH strategy, executive functioning, and rule-governance did not predict prosocial (donating) or rule-defiance (cheating) behavior in laboratory tasks. The limitations of relying solely on either self-report or behavioral tasks of unknown external validity are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectExecutive Functionen_US
dc.subjectLife History Theoryen_US
dc.subjectMoral Emotionsen_US
dc.subjectMoral Judgmenten_US
dc.subjectObedience to Authorityen_US
dc.subjectRule-Governanceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJacobs, W. Jakeen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFigueredo, Aurelio Jen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNichols, Shaunen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSechrest, Leeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11576-
dc.identifier.oclc752261440-
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