Success Course Intervention for Students on Academic Probation in Science Majors: A Longitudinal Quantitative Examination of the Treatment Effects on Performance, Persistence, and Graduation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145471
Title:
Success Course Intervention for Students on Academic Probation in Science Majors: A Longitudinal Quantitative Examination of the Treatment Effects on Performance, Persistence, and Graduation
Author:
McGrath, Shelley Marie
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
With increasing external and internal pressure to increase retention and graduation rates in select colleges along with increasing numbers of college-going populations over time, student affairs professionals have responded with a variety of programs to support students' transition to college. This study sought to examine freshman students in science majors went on academic probation at the end of their first semester. If these students did not raise their GPAs quickly, they faced academic dismissal from the institution. Consequently, the institution would not be able to retain them, and ultimately, they would not graduate. Managerial professionals at the institution created, implemented, and evaluated an intervention in the form of a success course for these students to help get them back on track, retain them, and ultimately graduate from the institution. The literatures drawn upon for this study included retention theory, probationary student behaviors and attitudes, interventions, success courses, fear appeal theories, academic capitalism, and institutional isomorphism. The study employed tests including chi-square, logistic regressions, and differences-in-differences fixed effects regressions to identify the differences and effects on performance, persistence, and graduation rates of the treatment and comparison groups. The findings of this study showed significant differences between the persistence and graduation rates of the treatment and control groups, and regression effects showed a short-term causal effect on performance as well as significant likelihoods of persisting and graduating within four or five years. Recommendations for further improvements to interventions are discussed in the final chapter.
Type:
Electronic Dissertation; text
Keywords:
academic captialism; causal effect; fear-arousing communication; insitutional isomorphism; intervention; probation
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rios-Aguilar, Ceclia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSuccess Course Intervention for Students on Academic Probation in Science Majors: A Longitudinal Quantitative Examination of the Treatment Effects on Performance, Persistence, and Graduationen_US
dc.creatorMcGrath, Shelley Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, Shelley Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWith increasing external and internal pressure to increase retention and graduation rates in select colleges along with increasing numbers of college-going populations over time, student affairs professionals have responded with a variety of programs to support students' transition to college. This study sought to examine freshman students in science majors went on academic probation at the end of their first semester. If these students did not raise their GPAs quickly, they faced academic dismissal from the institution. Consequently, the institution would not be able to retain them, and ultimately, they would not graduate. Managerial professionals at the institution created, implemented, and evaluated an intervention in the form of a success course for these students to help get them back on track, retain them, and ultimately graduate from the institution. The literatures drawn upon for this study included retention theory, probationary student behaviors and attitudes, interventions, success courses, fear appeal theories, academic capitalism, and institutional isomorphism. The study employed tests including chi-square, logistic regressions, and differences-in-differences fixed effects regressions to identify the differences and effects on performance, persistence, and graduation rates of the treatment and comparison groups. The findings of this study showed significant differences between the persistence and graduation rates of the treatment and control groups, and regression effects showed a short-term causal effect on performance as well as significant likelihoods of persisting and graduating within four or five years. Recommendations for further improvements to interventions are discussed in the final chapter.en_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectacademic captialismen_US
dc.subjectcausal effecten_US
dc.subjectfear-arousing communicationen_US
dc.subjectinsitutional isomorphismen_US
dc.subjectinterventionen_US
dc.subjectprobationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRios-Aguilar, Cecliaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDeil-Amen, Reginaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurd, Gail D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest11569-
dc.identifier.oclc752261434-
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