One World, Many Ethics. The Politics of Mining and Indigenous Peoples in Atacama, Chile

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145451
Title:
One World, Many Ethics. The Politics of Mining and Indigenous Peoples in Atacama, Chile
Author:
Carrasco, Anita
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation investigates the impacts of the mining economy on the lives of indigenous peoples in the city of Calama and Atacameno villages in the Loa River basin in northern Chile. It explores overlapping ethical systems that shape views of fairness and the environment: indigenous communities and mining corporation's views. The central inquiry revolves around reaching an understanding of how different underlying ethical systems and interrelated ideologies influence political decisions regarding what communities and lives will be allowed to persist and which will have to perish. This relationship between economics, politics, and morality will advance knowledge of the status of corporation-community relations and identify the main obstacles to sustainable positive relations in the future.
Type:
Electronic Dissertation; text
Keywords:
Chile; Ideology; Indigenous Peoples; Mining; Water
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Park, Thomas K

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleOne World, Many Ethics. The Politics of Mining and Indigenous Peoples in Atacama, Chileen_US
dc.creatorCarrasco, Anitaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarrasco, Anitaen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation investigates the impacts of the mining economy on the lives of indigenous peoples in the city of Calama and Atacameno villages in the Loa River basin in northern Chile. It explores overlapping ethical systems that shape views of fairness and the environment: indigenous communities and mining corporation's views. The central inquiry revolves around reaching an understanding of how different underlying ethical systems and interrelated ideologies influence political decisions regarding what communities and lives will be allowed to persist and which will have to perish. This relationship between economics, politics, and morality will advance knowledge of the status of corporation-community relations and identify the main obstacles to sustainable positive relations in the future.en_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectChileen_US
dc.subjectIdeologyen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous Peoplesen_US
dc.subjectMiningen_US
dc.subjectWateren_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPark, Thomas Ken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGreenberg, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLansing, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNichter, Marken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBauer, Carlen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11541-
dc.identifier.oclc752261406-
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