Ethnic Identity, Self-Esteem, Self-Efficacy, and Satisfaction with Life as Determinants of Sex Differences in Achievement among Black Adolescents

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145439
Title:
Ethnic Identity, Self-Esteem, Self-Efficacy, and Satisfaction with Life as Determinants of Sex Differences in Achievement among Black Adolescents
Author:
Belin, Comel
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Adolescence among Black high school youth is a challenging period of social, emotional and psychological development; particularly as it relates to factors of ethnic identity, academic skill, self-worth and achievement outcomes. Of interest to researchers are measurable sex differences in achievement among this demographic group. Current literature suggests that psychological traits such as ethnic identity, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and life satisfaction, are reliable predictors of achievement among this demographic. Consequently, the current study evaluated whether these particular psychological factors predicted sex differences in achievement. One hundred and forty high school students from Tucson and Phoenix school districts volunteered for the study. Responses were obtained from a demographic questionnaire, the Multi-Ethnic Identity Measure, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for Children, Satisfaction with Life Scale and the Perceived Caring Measure. These widely used measures are found to have adequate reliability and validity with Black adolescents. Multiple regression, correlation, MANOVA, and ANOVA analyzed criterion measures of Fall 2010 standardized achievement scores and grade point averages provided by participating school districts. Consistent with current research literature, findings support current data suggesting relationships between trait variables, achievement scores, and GPA. Further, the findings in this study provide support of current literature regarding the variability of psychological traits and sex among the participants in this study as predictors of achievement. Limitations, implications, and future directions for continued study of this topic are also discussed.
Type:
Electronic Dissertation; text
Keywords:
adolescents; Black; ethnic identity; life satisfaction; self-efficacy; self-esteem
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; School Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mishra, Shitala P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEthnic Identity, Self-Esteem, Self-Efficacy, and Satisfaction with Life as Determinants of Sex Differences in Achievement among Black Adolescentsen_US
dc.creatorBelin, Comelen_US
dc.contributor.authorBelin, Comelen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAdolescence among Black high school youth is a challenging period of social, emotional and psychological development; particularly as it relates to factors of ethnic identity, academic skill, self-worth and achievement outcomes. Of interest to researchers are measurable sex differences in achievement among this demographic group. Current literature suggests that psychological traits such as ethnic identity, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and life satisfaction, are reliable predictors of achievement among this demographic. Consequently, the current study evaluated whether these particular psychological factors predicted sex differences in achievement. One hundred and forty high school students from Tucson and Phoenix school districts volunteered for the study. Responses were obtained from a demographic questionnaire, the Multi-Ethnic Identity Measure, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for Children, Satisfaction with Life Scale and the Perceived Caring Measure. These widely used measures are found to have adequate reliability and validity with Black adolescents. Multiple regression, correlation, MANOVA, and ANOVA analyzed criterion measures of Fall 2010 standardized achievement scores and grade point averages provided by participating school districts. Consistent with current research literature, findings support current data suggesting relationships between trait variables, achievement scores, and GPA. Further, the findings in this study provide support of current literature regarding the variability of psychological traits and sex among the participants in this study as predictors of achievement. Limitations, implications, and future directions for continued study of this topic are also discussed.en_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectadolescentsen_US
dc.subjectBlacken_US
dc.subjectethnic identityen_US
dc.subjectlife satisfactionen_US
dc.subjectself-efficacyen_US
dc.subjectself-esteemen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMishra, Shitala P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPerfect, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFletcher, Todden_US
dc.identifier.proquest11627-
dc.identifier.oclc752261483-
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