Cultural Knowledge and Resources: Three Studies on the Role of Cultural Knowledge in Consumption

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145436
Title:
Cultural Knowledge and Resources: Three Studies on the Role of Cultural Knowledge in Consumption
Author:
Weinberger, Michelle
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Dissertation Not Available (per Author's Request) / University of Arizona affiliates can find this item in the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Full-text Database
Abstract:
Resources (natural, economic, social, and cultural) that people rely on for support are sources of power for social and economic actors, including consumers, households, and firms. Resources are created in the interaction of two component parts: cultural knowledge and latent materials. Human actors need to apply appropriate cultural knowledge to latent material (objects, experiences, and potential relationships) in order for them to be converted into resources; cultural knowledge needs to be applied to latent materials to render them meaningful and useful. In this sense, agency and power, one's ability to act in the world, rest not only in resources but also in these underlying components. As such, there is ample motivation for marketers to study and understand not only resources, but also the role of cultural knowledge as an activator in contemporary society.The introductory chapter conceptually develops the thesis that cultural knowledge governs the successful activation and use of latent materials to generate resources. Since understanding cultural knowledge is so important, the introduction then motivates three separate empirical studies on the dynamic role of cultural knowledge in consumers' lives. Each focuses on either how cultural knowledge is (1) accumulated by individual consumers post socialization, (2) deployed by individual consumers, or (3) deployed through collective consumption. Each empirical study is a self-contained project with its own theoretical development and contribution to the marketing and sociology literature, yet each contributes to an overall theoretical understanding of cultural knowledge.
Type:
Electronic Dissertation; text
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wallendorf, Melanie

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCultural Knowledge and Resources: Three Studies on the Role of Cultural Knowledge in Consumptionen_US
dc.creatorWeinberger, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeinberger, Michelleen_US
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseDissertation Not Available (per Author's Request) / University of Arizona affiliates can find this item in the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Full-text Databaseen_US
dc.description.abstractResources (natural, economic, social, and cultural) that people rely on for support are sources of power for social and economic actors, including consumers, households, and firms. Resources are created in the interaction of two component parts: cultural knowledge and latent materials. Human actors need to apply appropriate cultural knowledge to latent material (objects, experiences, and potential relationships) in order for them to be converted into resources; cultural knowledge needs to be applied to latent materials to render them meaningful and useful. In this sense, agency and power, one's ability to act in the world, rest not only in resources but also in these underlying components. As such, there is ample motivation for marketers to study and understand not only resources, but also the role of cultural knowledge as an activator in contemporary society.The introductory chapter conceptually develops the thesis that cultural knowledge governs the successful activation and use of latent materials to generate resources. Since understanding cultural knowledge is so important, the introduction then motivates three separate empirical studies on the dynamic role of cultural knowledge in consumers' lives. Each focuses on either how cultural knowledge is (1) accumulated by individual consumers post socialization, (2) deployed by individual consumers, or (3) deployed through collective consumption. Each empirical study is a self-contained project with its own theoretical development and contribution to the marketing and sociology literature, yet each contributes to an overall theoretical understanding of cultural knowledge.en_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWallendorf, Melanieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLusch, Robert F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchau, Hope J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZavisca, Janeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10504-
dc.identifier.oclc659752221-
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