Team Member Characteristics Contributing to High Reliability in Emergency Response Teams Managing Critical Incidents

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145418
Title:
Team Member Characteristics Contributing to High Reliability in Emergency Response Teams Managing Critical Incidents
Author:
Larson, Wanda J.
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Emergency response team (ERT) member characteristics that contribute to High Reliability performance during patient care resuscitation events or other Critical Incident Management Situations are poorly understood. Findings from this study describe individual characteristics that experienced interprofessional ERT members perceive as contributing to High Reliability performance within the critical incident management context. This study supports the need for interprofessional research about emergency response teams’ High Reliability in hospital-based settings. ERT High Reliability, or “better than expected” team performance has been linked to overall patient care and safety. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe individual team member characteristics that contribute to High Reliability performance of ERT members and the overall emergency response team in a naturalistic setting during Critical Incident Management Situations. Using a qualitative descriptive design, data collection included participant observations, field notes, and interviews. Narrative data were audio-taped, transcribed and coded using Ethnograph v6©. Data content were analyzed thematically using inductive interpretive methods. Two major domains derived from the data were Self-Regulation and Whole-Team Regulation. The overarching theme, Orchestrating High Reliability at the Edge of Chaos, encompassed characteristics contributing to High Reliability performance of the ERT during Critical Incident Management Situations.
Type:
Electronic Dissertation; text
Keywords:
Complex Adaptive System; Critical Incident Management; Emergency Response Team; High Reliability Organization; Resuscitation Teams; Trauma Team
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McEwen, Marylyn M

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTeam Member Characteristics Contributing to High Reliability in Emergency Response Teams Managing Critical Incidentsen_US
dc.creatorLarson, Wanda J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLarson, Wanda J.en_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEmergency response team (ERT) member characteristics that contribute to High Reliability performance during patient care resuscitation events or other Critical Incident Management Situations are poorly understood. Findings from this study describe individual characteristics that experienced interprofessional ERT members perceive as contributing to High Reliability performance within the critical incident management context. This study supports the need for interprofessional research about emergency response teams’ High Reliability in hospital-based settings. ERT High Reliability, or “better than expected” team performance has been linked to overall patient care and safety. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe individual team member characteristics that contribute to High Reliability performance of ERT members and the overall emergency response team in a naturalistic setting during Critical Incident Management Situations. Using a qualitative descriptive design, data collection included participant observations, field notes, and interviews. Narrative data were audio-taped, transcribed and coded using Ethnograph v6©. Data content were analyzed thematically using inductive interpretive methods. Two major domains derived from the data were Self-Regulation and Whole-Team Regulation. The overarching theme, Orchestrating High Reliability at the Edge of Chaos, encompassed characteristics contributing to High Reliability performance of the ERT during Critical Incident Management Situations.en_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectComplex Adaptive Systemen_US
dc.subjectCritical Incident Managementen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Response Teamen_US
dc.subjectHigh Reliability Organizationen_US
dc.subjectResuscitation Teamsen_US
dc.subjectTrauma Teamen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcEwen, Marylyn Men_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVincent, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEffken, Judithen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11546-
dc.identifier.oclc752261410-
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