Academic Entitlement and Incivility: Differences in Faculty and Students' Perceptions

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145417
Title:
Academic Entitlement and Incivility: Differences in Faculty and Students' Perceptions
Author:
Mellor, Jessie Kosorok
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examined differences in faculty and students' perspectives regarding the frequency, acceptability, and attributions for classroom incivilities and academic entitlement (AE). Nine behaviors commonly defined as incivility were measured and include: 1) sleeping in class, 2) inappropriate use of technology, 3) talking to other students during lecture, 4) leaving lecture without permission, 5) answering the phone during lecture, 6) displaying rude behavior, 7) expressing boredom, 8) expressing anger, and 9) confrontations regarding grades during class. A qualitative analysis of incivility and academic entitlement (AE) was also conducted. Examinations of both faculty and student perceptions of incivility have been reported; however, including faculty and student measures of both incivility and AE behaviors is a new addition to the literature. The sample included 31 faculty and 82 students from a Southwestern research-1 university. Both faculty and students agreed that on some level all nine incivilities were unacceptable. However, students were significantly less likely than faculty to say that inappropriate use of technology, talking during lecture, and leaving class without permission were unacceptable student behaviors. Reasons explaining why faculty and students believe the incivilities and AE behavior occurred are outlined. Implications for college policy are also discussed in light of the significant faculty and student differences in perception regarding what constitutes appropriate classroom behavior.
Type:
Electronic Dissertation; text
Keywords:
Academic Entitlement; Faculty; Incivility; Policy; Students
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McCaslin, Mary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAcademic Entitlement and Incivility: Differences in Faculty and Students' Perceptionsen_US
dc.creatorMellor, Jessie Kosoroken_US
dc.contributor.authorMellor, Jessie Kosoroken_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined differences in faculty and students' perspectives regarding the frequency, acceptability, and attributions for classroom incivilities and academic entitlement (AE). Nine behaviors commonly defined as incivility were measured and include: 1) sleeping in class, 2) inappropriate use of technology, 3) talking to other students during lecture, 4) leaving lecture without permission, 5) answering the phone during lecture, 6) displaying rude behavior, 7) expressing boredom, 8) expressing anger, and 9) confrontations regarding grades during class. A qualitative analysis of incivility and academic entitlement (AE) was also conducted. Examinations of both faculty and student perceptions of incivility have been reported; however, including faculty and student measures of both incivility and AE behaviors is a new addition to the literature. The sample included 31 faculty and 82 students from a Southwestern research-1 university. Both faculty and students agreed that on some level all nine incivilities were unacceptable. However, students were significantly less likely than faculty to say that inappropriate use of technology, talking during lecture, and leaving class without permission were unacceptable student behaviors. Reasons explaining why faculty and students believe the incivilities and AE behavior occurred are outlined. Implications for college policy are also discussed in light of the significant faculty and student differences in perception regarding what constitutes appropriate classroom behavior.en_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectAcademic Entitlementen_US
dc.subjectFacultyen_US
dc.subjectIncivilityen_US
dc.subjectPolicyen_US
dc.subjectStudentsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcCaslin, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurross, Heidi Leggen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGood, Thomas Len_US
dc.identifier.proquest11544-
dc.identifier.oclc752261409-
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