Leadership and Mission-Based Decision-Making: The U.S. Catholic Bishops' Responses to the Priest Shortage

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145412
Title:
Leadership and Mission-Based Decision-Making: The U.S. Catholic Bishops' Responses to the Priest Shortage
Author:
Hoegeman, Catherine Helen
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation applies upper echelon theory to a nonprofit religious organization to explore how leaders' mission perspectives influence their decisions, and in turn, how those decisions affect organizational outcomes. My case is the U.S. Roman Catholic Church and how bishops' theological ideologies influence their decisions about how to respond to the priest shortage. My findings are consistent with existing strategic management literature in that multiple factors are significant in predicting decision outcomes: the organizational characteristics, the local environment, and leader characteristics. Bishops ideology had some effect, suggesting that bishops were influenced by their understanding of mission and exercised value-rational decision-making. However, the objective situation, the scope of the priest shortage, had more consistent effects. This characterizes bishops' decision-making as instrumentally rational. My findings also suggest an influence from the broader institutional environment. The prevailing ideology/culture of the Roman Catholic Church had different influences at different time periods. Additional analyses showed that the bishops' decisions affected organizational outcomes. Based on measures of membership levels and participation, there was a negative response to use of non-traditional forms of parish leadership, as indicated by reductions in the numbers of Catholics and sacramental activity.
Type:
Electronic Dissertation; text
Keywords:
Catholicism; Decision-Making; Leadership
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Sociology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Galaskiewicz, Joseph

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLeadership and Mission-Based Decision-Making: The U.S. Catholic Bishops' Responses to the Priest Shortageen_US
dc.creatorHoegeman, Catherine Helenen_US
dc.contributor.authorHoegeman, Catherine Helenen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation applies upper echelon theory to a nonprofit religious organization to explore how leaders' mission perspectives influence their decisions, and in turn, how those decisions affect organizational outcomes. My case is the U.S. Roman Catholic Church and how bishops' theological ideologies influence their decisions about how to respond to the priest shortage. My findings are consistent with existing strategic management literature in that multiple factors are significant in predicting decision outcomes: the organizational characteristics, the local environment, and leader characteristics. Bishops ideology had some effect, suggesting that bishops were influenced by their understanding of mission and exercised value-rational decision-making. However, the objective situation, the scope of the priest shortage, had more consistent effects. This characterizes bishops' decision-making as instrumentally rational. My findings also suggest an influence from the broader institutional environment. The prevailing ideology/culture of the Roman Catholic Church had different influences at different time periods. Additional analyses showed that the bishops' decisions affected organizational outcomes. Based on measures of membership levels and participation, there was a negative response to use of non-traditional forms of parish leadership, as indicated by reductions in the numbers of Catholics and sacramental activity.en_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectCatholicismen_US
dc.subjectDecision-Makingen_US
dc.subjectLeadershipen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGalaskiewicz, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBergesen, Albert J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBeyerlein, Kraigen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLeahey, Erinen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11453-
dc.identifier.oclc752261323-
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