Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145388
Title:
Insect-Machine Interfacing
Author:
Melano, Timothy
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A terrestrial robotic electrophysiology platform has been developed that can hold a moth (<italic>Manduca sexta</italic>), record signals from its brain or muscles, and use these signals to control the rotation of the robot. All signal processing (electrophysiology, spike detection, and robotic control) was performed onboard the robot with custom designed electronic circuits. Wireless telemetry allowed remote communication with the robot. In this study, we interfaced directionally-sensitive visual neurons and pleurodorsal steering muscles of the mesothorax with the robot and used the spike rate of these signals to control its rotation, thereby emulating the classical optomotor response known from studies of the fly visual system. The interfacing of insect and machine can contribute to our understanding of the neurobiological processes underlying behavior and also suggest promising advancements in biosensors and human brain-machine interfaces.
Type:
Electronic Dissertation; text
Keywords:
biosensors; brain-machine interfacing; insect-machine interfacing; insect vision; spike detection; visual motion
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Biomedical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Higgins, Charles M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleInsect-Machine Interfacingen_US
dc.creatorMelano, Timothyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMelano, Timothyen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA terrestrial robotic electrophysiology platform has been developed that can hold a moth (<italic>Manduca sexta</italic>), record signals from its brain or muscles, and use these signals to control the rotation of the robot. All signal processing (electrophysiology, spike detection, and robotic control) was performed onboard the robot with custom designed electronic circuits. Wireless telemetry allowed remote communication with the robot. In this study, we interfaced directionally-sensitive visual neurons and pleurodorsal steering muscles of the mesothorax with the robot and used the spike rate of these signals to control its rotation, thereby emulating the classical optomotor response known from studies of the fly visual system. The interfacing of insect and machine can contribute to our understanding of the neurobiological processes underlying behavior and also suggest promising advancements in biosensors and human brain-machine interfaces.en_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectbiosensorsen_US
dc.subjectbrain-machine interfacingen_US
dc.subjectinsect-machine interfacingen_US
dc.subjectinsect visionen_US
dc.subjectspike detectionen_US
dc.subjectvisual motionen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiomedical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHiggins, Charles M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFrye, Mark A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGronenberg, Wulfilaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHildebrand, John G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStrausfeld, Nicholas J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest11434-
dc.identifier.oclc752261307-
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