Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145362
Title:
Cognitive Mechanisms of False Facial Recognition
Author:
Edmonds, Emily Charlotte
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Face recognition involves a number of complex cognitive processes, including memory, executive functioning, and perception. A breakdown of one or more of these processes may result in false facial recognition, a memory distortion in which one mistakenly believes that novel faces are familiar. This study examined the cognitive mechanisms underlying false facial recognition in healthy older and younger adults, patients with frontotemporal dementia, and individuals with congenital prosopagnosia. Participants completed face recognition memory tests that included several different types of lures, as well as tests of face perception. Older adults demonstrated a familiarity-based response strategy, reflecting a deficit in source monitoring and impaired recollection of context, as they could not reliably discriminate between study faces and highly familiar lures. In patients with frontotemporal dementia, temporal lobe atrophy alone was associated with a reduction of true facial recognition, while concurrent frontal lobe damage was associated with increased false recognition, a liberal response bias, and an overreliance on "gist" memory when making recognition decisions. Individuals with congenital prosopagnosia demonstrated deficits in configural processing of faces and a reliance on feature-based processing, leading to false recognition of lures that had features in common from study to test. These findings may have important implications for the development of training programs that could serve to help individuals improve their ability to accurately recognize faces.
Type:
Electronic Dissertation; text
Keywords:
Aging; Dementia; Face recognition; False recognition; Memory; Prosopagnosia
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Glisky, Elizabeth

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCognitive Mechanisms of False Facial Recognitionen_US
dc.creatorEdmonds, Emily Charlotteen_US
dc.contributor.authorEdmonds, Emily Charlotteen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFace recognition involves a number of complex cognitive processes, including memory, executive functioning, and perception. A breakdown of one or more of these processes may result in false facial recognition, a memory distortion in which one mistakenly believes that novel faces are familiar. This study examined the cognitive mechanisms underlying false facial recognition in healthy older and younger adults, patients with frontotemporal dementia, and individuals with congenital prosopagnosia. Participants completed face recognition memory tests that included several different types of lures, as well as tests of face perception. Older adults demonstrated a familiarity-based response strategy, reflecting a deficit in source monitoring and impaired recollection of context, as they could not reliably discriminate between study faces and highly familiar lures. In patients with frontotemporal dementia, temporal lobe atrophy alone was associated with a reduction of true facial recognition, while concurrent frontal lobe damage was associated with increased false recognition, a liberal response bias, and an overreliance on "gist" memory when making recognition decisions. Individuals with congenital prosopagnosia demonstrated deficits in configural processing of faces and a reliance on feature-based processing, leading to false recognition of lures that had features in common from study to test. These findings may have important implications for the development of training programs that could serve to help individuals improve their ability to accurately recognize faces.en_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectAgingen_US
dc.subjectDementiaen_US
dc.subjectFace recognitionen_US
dc.subjectFalse recognitionen_US
dc.subjectMemoryen_US
dc.subjectProsopagnosiaen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGlisky, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKaszniak, Alfreden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRapcsak, Stevenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRyan, Leeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11065-
dc.identifier.oclc752261281-
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