Navigating the Transition: The Informational Networks and Help-Seeking Behavior of Community College Transfer Students

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145297
Title:
Navigating the Transition: The Informational Networks and Help-Seeking Behavior of Community College Transfer Students
Author:
O'Brien, Celia Laird
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
While community college transfer students who successfully matriculate into the four-year institution enjoy high persistence and graduation rates, inequities continue to be inherent throughout the process. In order to succeed during this transition, students must employ effective help-seeking strategies that provide them with access to timely and accurate information. This study seeks to be a formal examination of these informational networks. It describes the extensity, composition and positionality of these networks as transfer students exit the community college and enter a large research-extensive university. It also studies the effect that participation in a transfer course has on these informational networks. The results imply that informational networks remain relatively similar throughout the transfer process but that certain populations, including first-generation students and females, are less likely to rely on institutional agents for information. In addition, the effects of a transfer success course appear to be short-term, although it may reap larger benefits for at-risk populations. These findings suggest that socio-academic integration theories are more relevant to community college transfer students than theories based on traditional populations who enter four-year institutions directly out of high school.
Type:
Electronic Dissertation; text
Keywords:
Community colleges; Informational networks; Social capital; Social networks; Transfer students
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleNavigating the Transition: The Informational Networks and Help-Seeking Behavior of Community College Transfer Studentsen_US
dc.creatorO'Brien, Celia Lairden_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Celia Lairden_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhile community college transfer students who successfully matriculate into the four-year institution enjoy high persistence and graduation rates, inequities continue to be inherent throughout the process. In order to succeed during this transition, students must employ effective help-seeking strategies that provide them with access to timely and accurate information. This study seeks to be a formal examination of these informational networks. It describes the extensity, composition and positionality of these networks as transfer students exit the community college and enter a large research-extensive university. It also studies the effect that participation in a transfer course has on these informational networks. The results imply that informational networks remain relatively similar throughout the transfer process but that certain populations, including first-generation students and females, are less likely to rely on institutional agents for information. In addition, the effects of a transfer success course appear to be short-term, although it may reap larger benefits for at-risk populations. These findings suggest that socio-academic integration theories are more relevant to community college transfer students than theories based on traditional populations who enter four-year institutions directly out of high school.en_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectCommunity collegesen_US
dc.subjectInformational networksen_US
dc.subjectSocial capitalen_US
dc.subjectSocial networksen_US
dc.subjectTransfer studentsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRios-Aguilar, Ceciliaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMilem, Jeffrey F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDeil-Amen, Reginaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11487-
dc.identifier.oclc752261356-
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