An Exploration of the Relationships Among Relatedness, Identity Threat, and Academic Achievement in Minority Students in Higher Education

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145296
Title:
An Exploration of the Relationships Among Relatedness, Identity Threat, and Academic Achievement in Minority Students in Higher Education
Author:
Hernandez, Diley
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to identify significant relationships betweenidentity threat, relatedness or sense of belongingness, and academic achievement in asample of minority college students who were enrolled in an underrepresented academicfield in higher education. Our sample included 56 Hispanic students enrolled in an Organic Chemistry class at a Southwest University. Findings show that Ethnic Sense ofBelongingness positively predicted Classroom Sense of Belongingness, which in turnpredicted Effort. This relationship was also impacted by students' perceptions of Self-Efficacy to Achieve, Teacher Trust and Academic Support, and Intrinsic Motivation andKnow and Accomplish. Overall, findings highlight the influence of ethnic sense ofbelongingness at school, in achievement and motivational processes in the classroom.
Type:
Electronic Dissertation; text
Keywords:
Academic Achievement; Identity Threat; Motivation; Relatedness; Self-Determination Theory
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Summers, Jessica J.
Committee Chair:
Summers, Jessica J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn Exploration of the Relationships Among Relatedness, Identity Threat, and Academic Achievement in Minority Students in Higher Educationen_US
dc.creatorHernandez, Dileyen_US
dc.contributor.authorHernandez, Dileyen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to identify significant relationships betweenidentity threat, relatedness or sense of belongingness, and academic achievement in asample of minority college students who were enrolled in an underrepresented academicfield in higher education. Our sample included 56 Hispanic students enrolled in an Organic Chemistry class at a Southwest University. Findings show that Ethnic Sense ofBelongingness positively predicted Classroom Sense of Belongingness, which in turnpredicted Effort. This relationship was also impacted by students' perceptions of Self-Efficacy to Achieve, Teacher Trust and Academic Support, and Intrinsic Motivation andKnow and Accomplish. Overall, findings highlight the influence of ethnic sense ofbelongingness at school, in achievement and motivational processes in the classroom.en_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectAcademic Achievementen_US
dc.subjectIdentity Threaten_US
dc.subjectMotivationen_US
dc.subjectRelatednessen_US
dc.subjectSelf-Determination Theoryen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSummers, Jessica J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairSummers, Jessica J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGood, Thomas L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurross, Heidi H.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest11488-
dc.identifier.oclc752261357-
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