At the Intersection of Class and Disability: The Impact of Forms of Capital on College Access and Success for Students with Learning Disabilities

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145292
Title:
At the Intersection of Class and Disability: The Impact of Forms of Capital on College Access and Success for Students with Learning Disabilities
Author:
Haeger, Heather Anne
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research addresses how socioeconomic status impacts the ways that students with learning disabilities and their families interact with the school system and the consequences of these interactions. This will inform policy on special education, and college level services and accommodations for students with learning disabilities. In addition to exploring general patterns of college attendance for students with learning disabilities, this research will include an analysis of what factors best predict college attendance and persistence for students with learning disabilities. Specifically, the forms of capital framework including economic, social, and cultural capital along with habitus are used to understand issues of access and success in college. The primary findings of this study include a) the intersection of socioeconomic status and disability create an extreme form of stratification in college attendance for students with learning disabilities, b) each form of capital is significantly related to college attendance, c) measures of habitus are some of the strongest predictors of college attendance, d) forms of capital best predict college attendance at four-year colleges and universities and are less predictive for other forms of post-secondary education, and e) current models of college persistence may not be accurate for this population of students.
Type:
Electronic Dissertation; text
Keywords:
College Access; Cultural Capital; Habitus; Learning Disability; Persistence; Social Capital
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAt the Intersection of Class and Disability: The Impact of Forms of Capital on College Access and Success for Students with Learning Disabilitiesen_US
dc.creatorHaeger, Heather Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorHaeger, Heather Anneen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research addresses how socioeconomic status impacts the ways that students with learning disabilities and their families interact with the school system and the consequences of these interactions. This will inform policy on special education, and college level services and accommodations for students with learning disabilities. In addition to exploring general patterns of college attendance for students with learning disabilities, this research will include an analysis of what factors best predict college attendance and persistence for students with learning disabilities. Specifically, the forms of capital framework including economic, social, and cultural capital along with habitus are used to understand issues of access and success in college. The primary findings of this study include a) the intersection of socioeconomic status and disability create an extreme form of stratification in college attendance for students with learning disabilities, b) each form of capital is significantly related to college attendance, c) measures of habitus are some of the strongest predictors of college attendance, d) forms of capital best predict college attendance at four-year colleges and universities and are less predictive for other forms of post-secondary education, and e) current models of college persistence may not be accurate for this population of students.en_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectCollege Accessen_US
dc.subjectCultural Capitalen_US
dc.subjectHabitusen_US
dc.subjectLearning Disabilityen_US
dc.subjectPersistenceen_US
dc.subjectSocial Capitalen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRios-Aguilar, Ceciliaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLee, Jennyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDeil-Amen, Reginaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11502-
dc.identifier.oclc752261367-
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