Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145279
Title:
INTERVENTION: (RE)ARTICULATING LGBT SOCIAL-MOVEMENT IDENTITIES
Author:
Werner, Margaret MacGregor
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this dissertation I use rhetorical analysis and draw on articulation theory, primarily as it is conceived by Stuart Hall, to analyze the ways that LGBT social movements constitute and strategically deploy macro-level identities. This research focuses on the ways that movement identities--from the gay liberation of Stonewall through the current movements for marriage and military service--are rhetorically constructed. By tracking national LGBT social-movement organizations through such dynamic changes, my analyses reveal the ways that rearticulating the identity of a social movement can help groups change strategies and identifications when activist practices are failing. This scholarship adds to existing research on the ways that social movements constitute and reconstitute their shared sense of identity in the midst of evolving social contexts and also suggests some ways that multimodal rhetorics shape the development of movements.
Type:
Electronic Dissertation; text
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Miller, Thomas P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleINTERVENTION: (RE)ARTICULATING LGBT SOCIAL-MOVEMENT IDENTITIESen_US
dc.creatorWerner, Margaret MacGregoren_US
dc.contributor.authorWerner, Margaret MacGregoren_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation I use rhetorical analysis and draw on articulation theory, primarily as it is conceived by Stuart Hall, to analyze the ways that LGBT social movements constitute and strategically deploy macro-level identities. This research focuses on the ways that movement identities--from the gay liberation of Stonewall through the current movements for marriage and military service--are rhetorically constructed. By tracking national LGBT social-movement organizations through such dynamic changes, my analyses reveal the ways that rearticulating the identity of a social movement can help groups change strategies and identifications when activist practices are failing. This scholarship adds to existing research on the ways that social movements constitute and reconstitute their shared sense of identity in the midst of evolving social contexts and also suggests some ways that multimodal rhetorics shape the development of movements.en_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMiller, Thomas P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEnos, Theresa J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLicona, Adela C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest11485-
dc.identifier.oclc752261353-
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