Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/145131
Title:
The Spatial Politics of Drone Warfare
Author:
Shaw, Ian
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation investigates drone warfare, which is the military's use of unmanned planes to strike enemy targets, an integral and relatively new strategy in the `war on terror'. The dissertation is composed of three unique research papers. The first gets to grips with how this warfare is represented in video games. These virtual spaces contain carefully crafted aesthetics that are important for widespread cultural participation, recruitment, and legitimization. The second paper investigates the use of U.S. military drones in the tribal regions of Pakistan, a historically `exceptional' territory that today finds itself the continued subject of colonial violence. The paper is motivated by understanding the logic of the legislation that enables such warfare, as well as the military's `fetishization' of the drone as an actor devoid of social relations. The third paper builds upon the second to take seriously the drone as an object of extreme political importance. The analytic is driven by `object-oriented philosophy' and argues that drones are metaphysical objects responsible for slicing and dicing the world into their own image. Overall, the main contribution of the dissertation is to signal and review the political importance of a new and deadly military zeitgeist: one that encroaches upon everyday life, geopolitics, and reality itself.
Type:
Electronic Dissertation; text
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geography
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jones, John III

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Spatial Politics of Drone Warfareen_US
dc.creatorShaw, Ianen_US
dc.contributor.authorShaw, Ianen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation investigates drone warfare, which is the military's use of unmanned planes to strike enemy targets, an integral and relatively new strategy in the `war on terror'. The dissertation is composed of three unique research papers. The first gets to grips with how this warfare is represented in video games. These virtual spaces contain carefully crafted aesthetics that are important for widespread cultural participation, recruitment, and legitimization. The second paper investigates the use of U.S. military drones in the tribal regions of Pakistan, a historically `exceptional' territory that today finds itself the continued subject of colonial violence. The paper is motivated by understanding the logic of the legislation that enables such warfare, as well as the military's `fetishization' of the drone as an actor devoid of social relations. The third paper builds upon the second to take seriously the drone as an object of extreme political importance. The analytic is driven by `object-oriented philosophy' and argues that drones are metaphysical objects responsible for slicing and dicing the world into their own image. Overall, the main contribution of the dissertation is to signal and review the political importance of a new and deadly military zeitgeist: one that encroaches upon everyday life, geopolitics, and reality itself.en_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJones, John IIIen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarston, Sallieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRobbins, Paulen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWaterstone, Marven_US
dc.identifier.proquest11524-
dc.identifier.oclc752261388-
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